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Title: Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity

Abstract

Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-Q bulk acoustic wave cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC superconducting quantum interference device amplifier. High Q modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 23 dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high (Q > 10{sup 8} at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)
  2. School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)
  3. Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l'Épitaphe, 25000 Besançon (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22350927
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 15; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; AMPLIFIERS; EQUIVALENT CIRCUITS; EXCITATION; FLUCTUATIONS; QUALITY FACTOR; RESONATORS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SOUND WAVES; SQUID DEVICES

Citation Formats

Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au, Ivanov, Eugene N., Tobar, Michael E., Kann, Frank van, and Galliou, Serge. Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4898813.
Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au, Ivanov, Eugene N., Tobar, Michael E., Kann, Frank van, & Galliou, Serge. Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4898813.
Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au, Ivanov, Eugene N., Tobar, Michael E., Kann, Frank van, and Galliou, Serge. Mon . "Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4898813.
@article{osti_22350927,
title = {Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity},
author = {Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au and Ivanov, Eugene N. and Tobar, Michael E. and Kann, Frank van and Galliou, Serge},
abstractNote = {Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-Q bulk acoustic wave cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC superconducting quantum interference device amplifier. High Q modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 23 dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high (Q > 10{sup 8} at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4898813},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 15,
volume = 105,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 13 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Oct 13 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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