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Title: The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

Abstract

Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions weremore » made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [1];
  1. Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica, Periférico Sur No. 4809, Col. Arenal Tepepan, Delegación Tlalpan, México, D.F. C.P. 14610 (Mexico)
  2. Departments of Radiology and Medicine, The University of Tennessee Medical Center, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  3. Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad 2001, Col. Chamilpa Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62210 (Mexico)
  4. Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Calle CEPROBI No. 8, Col. San Isidro, Yautepec, Morelos C.P. 62731 (Mexico)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22242259
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 443; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACRYLAMIDE; AGGLOMERATION; ELONGATION; ENVIRONMENT; FLUORESCENCE; IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MOLECULES; MUTATIONS; NUCLEATION; QUENCHING

Citation Formats

Pozo-Yauner, Luis del, E-mail: ldelpozo@inmegen.gob.mx, Wall, Jonathan S., González Andrade, Martín, Sánchez-López, Rosana, Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L., Pérez Carreón, Julio I., and and others. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.123.
Pozo-Yauner, Luis del, E-mail: ldelpozo@inmegen.gob.mx, Wall, Jonathan S., González Andrade, Martín, Sánchez-López, Rosana, Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L., Pérez Carreón, Julio I., & and others. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.123.
Pozo-Yauner, Luis del, E-mail: ldelpozo@inmegen.gob.mx, Wall, Jonathan S., González Andrade, Martín, Sánchez-López, Rosana, Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L., Pérez Carreón, Julio I., and and others. Fri . "The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.123.
@article{osti_22242259,
title = {The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis},
author = {Pozo-Yauner, Luis del, E-mail: ldelpozo@inmegen.gob.mx and Wall, Jonathan S. and González Andrade, Martín and Sánchez-López, Rosana and Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L. and Pérez Carreón, Julio I. and and others},
abstractNote = {Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2013.11.123},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 443,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2014},
month = {Fri Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2014}
}
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