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Title: DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

Abstract

Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{supmore » 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)
  2. W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)
  3. Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21562532
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 736; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DISPERSION RELATIONS; MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES; SOLAR CORONA; WAVE PROPAGATION; ATMOSPHERES; HYDROMAGNETIC WAVES; SOLAR ATMOSPHERE; STELLAR ATMOSPHERES; STELLAR CORONAE

Citation Formats

Liu Wei, Title, Alan M., Schrijver, Carolus J., Aschwanden, Markus J., De Pontieu, Bart, Tarbell, Theodore D., Zhao Junwei, and Ofman, Leon. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L13.
Liu Wei, Title, Alan M., Schrijver, Carolus J., Aschwanden, Markus J., De Pontieu, Bart, Tarbell, Theodore D., Zhao Junwei, & Ofman, Leon. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY. United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L13.
Liu Wei, Title, Alan M., Schrijver, Carolus J., Aschwanden, Markus J., De Pontieu, Bart, Tarbell, Theodore D., Zhao Junwei, and Ofman, Leon. Wed . "DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY". United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L13.
@article{osti_21562532,
title = {DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY},
author = {Liu Wei and Title, Alan M. and Schrijver, Carolus J. and Aschwanden, Markus J. and De Pontieu, Bart and Tarbell, Theodore D. and Zhao Junwei and Ofman, Leon},
abstractNote = {Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.},
doi = {10.1088/2041-8205/736/1/L13},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 736,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 20 00:00:00 EDT 2011},
month = {Wed Jul 20 00:00:00 EDT 2011}
}
  • This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 Å channel. Here we focusmore » on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.« less
  • Since the discovery of quasi-periodic propagating oscillations with periods of order 3-10 minutes in coronal loops with TRACE and SOHO/EIT (and later with STEREO/EUVI and Hinode/EIS), they have been almost universally interpreted as evidence for propagating slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves in the low plasma {beta} coronal environment. Here we show that this interpretation is not unique, and that for coronal loops associated with plage regions (as opposed to sunspots), the presence of magnetoacoustic waves may not be the only cause for the observed quasi-periodicities. We focus instead on the ubiquitous, faint upflows at 50-150 km s{sup -1} that were recently discoveredmore » as blueward asymmetries of spectral line profiles in footpoint regions of coronal loops, and as faint disturbances propagating along coronal loops in EUV/X-ray imaging time series. These faint upflows are most likely driven from below and have been associated with chromospheric jets that are (partially) rapidly heated to coronal temperatures at low heights. These two scenarios (waves versus flows) are difficult to differentiate using only imaging data, but careful analysis of spectral line profiles indicates that faint upflows are likely responsible for some of the observed quasi-periodic oscillatory signals in the corona. We show that recent EIS measurements of intensity and velocity oscillations of coronal lines (which had previously been interpreted as direct evidence for propagating waves) are actually accompanied by significant oscillations in the line width that are driven by a quasi-periodically varying component of emission in the blue wing of the line. This faint additional component of blue-shifted emission quasi-periodically modulates the peak intensity and line centroid of a single Gaussian fit to the spectral profile with the same small amplitudes (respectively a few percent of background intensity and a few km s{sup -1}) that were previously used to infer the presence of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Our results indicate that it is possible that a significant fraction of the quasi-periodicities observed with coronal imagers and spectrographs that have previously been interpreted as propagating magnetoacoustic waves are instead caused by these upflows. The different physical cause for coronal oscillations would significantly impact the prospects of successful coronal seismology using propagating disturbances in coronal loops.« less
  • We first report the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flare loops during an eruptive X-class flare on 2014 September 10. The slipping motion was investigated at a specific location along one of the two ribbons and can be observed throughout the impulsive phase of the flare. The apparent slipping velocity was 20–110 km s{sup −1}, and the associated period was 3–6 minutes. The footpoints of flare loops appeared as small-scale bright knots observed in 1400 Å, corresponding to fine structures of the flare ribbon. These bright knots were observed to move along the southern part of the longer ribbon and alsomore » exhibited a quasi-periodic pattern. The Si iv 1402.77 Å line was redshifted by 30–50 km s{sup −1} at the locations of moving knots with a ∼40–60 km s{sup −1} line width, larger than other sites of the flare ribbon. We suggest that the quasi-periodic slipping reconnection is involved in this process and the redshift at the bright knots is probably indicative of reconnection downflow. The emission line of Si iv at the northern part of the longer ribbon also exhibited obvious redshifts of about 10–70 km s{sup −1} in the impulsive phase of the flare, with the redshifts at the outer edges of the ribbon larger than those in the middle. The redshift velocities at post-flare loops reached about 80–100 km s{sup −1} in the transition region.« less
  • We observe the motion of cool and hot plasma in a multi-stranded post-flare loop (PFL) system that evolved in the decay phase of a two-ribbon M1.0 class flare in AR 11093 on 2010 August 7 using the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 304 A and 171 A filters. The moving intensity feature and its reflected counterpart are observed in the loop system at multiple temperatures. The observed hot counterpart of the plasma probably envelopes the cool confined plasma and moves comparatively faster ({approx}34 km s{sup -1}) than the latter (29 km s{sup -1}) in the form of a spreading intensitymore » feature. The propagating plasma and intensity reflect from the region of another footpoint of the loop. The subsonic speed of the moving plasma and associated intensity feature may be most likely evolved in the PFL system through impulsive flare heating processes. Complementing our observations of moving multi-temperature intensity features in the PFL system and its reflection, we also attempt to solve two-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically using the VAL-IIIC atmosphere as an initial condition to simulate the observed plasma dynamics. We consider a localized thermal pulse impulsively generated near one footpoint of the loop system during the flare processes, which is launched along the magnetic field lines at the solar chromosphere. The pulse steepens into a slow shock at higher altitudes while moving along this loop system, which triggers plasma perturbations that closely exhibit the observed plasma dynamics.« less
  • Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s{sup -1} at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun (QS) regions. Outflows are also visible in the 'inter-plume' regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continuallymore » exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the QS and coronal holes (CHs), and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mass into the corona and serve as an important source of mass supply to the solar wind. We demonstrate that the QS plume flows can sometimes significantly contaminate the spectroscopic observations of the adjacent CHs-greatly affecting the Doppler shifts observed, thus potentially impacting significant investigations of such regions.« less