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Title: Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy Compared With Static Gantry Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Tumor: A Feasibility Study

Abstract

Purpose: A planning study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), a volumetric modulated arc technique, on malignant pleural mesothelioma. The benchmark was conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: The computed tomography data sets of 6 patients were included. The plans for IMRT with nine fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with a single isocenter. All plans were optimized for 15-MV photon beams. The dose prescription was 54 Gy to the planning target volume. The planning objectives for the planning target volume were a minimal dose of >95% and maximal dose of <107%. For the organs at risk, the parameters were as follows: contralateral lung, percentage of volume receiving 5 Gy (V{sub 5Gy}) <60%, V{sub 20Gy} < 10%, mean <10.0 Gy; liver, V{sub 30Gy} <33%, mean <31 Gy; heart, V{sub 45Gy} <30%, V{sub 50Gy} <20%, dose received by 1% of the volume (D{sub 1%}) <60 Gy; contralateral kidney, V{sub 15Gy} <20%; spine, D{sub 1%} <45 Gy; esophagus, V{sub 55Gy} <30%; and spleen, V{sub 40Gy} <50%. The monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were scored to measure the treatment efficiency. The pretreatment portal dosimetry scored delivery to the calculation agreement with the Gamma Agreement Index. Results: RA and IMRTmore » provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity. Both techniques fulfilled objectives on organs at risk with a tendency of RA to improve sparing. The conformity index was 1.9 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT. The number of MU/2Gy was 734 {+-} 82 for RA and 2,195 {+-} 317 for IMRT. The planning vs. delivery agreement revealed a Gamma Agreement Index for IMRT of 96.0% {+-} 2.6% and for RA of 95.7% {+-} 1.5%. The treatment time was 3.7 {+-} 0.3min for RA and 13.4 {+-} 0.1min for IMRT. Conclusion: RA demonstrated compared with conventional IMRT, similar target coverage and better dose sparing to the organs at risks. The number of MUs and the time required to deliver a 2-Gy fraction were much lower for RA, allowing the possibility to incorporate this technique in the treatment options for mesothelioma patients.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy)
  2. Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21436057
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.09.053; PII: S0360-3016 (09)03332-X; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ESOPHAGUS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; HEART; KIDNEYS; LIVER; LUNGS; MODULATION; NEOPLASMS; PHOTON BEAMS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SPLEEN; VERTEBRAE; BEAMS; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; DOSES; GLANDS; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANS; RADIOLOGY; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; SKELETON; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Scorsetti, Marta, Bignardi, Mario, and Clivio, Alessandro. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy Compared With Static Gantry Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Tumor: A Feasibility Study. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.09.053.
Scorsetti, Marta, Bignardi, Mario, & Clivio, Alessandro. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy Compared With Static Gantry Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Tumor: A Feasibility Study. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.09.053.
Scorsetti, Marta, Bignardi, Mario, and Clivio, Alessandro. 2010. "Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy Compared With Static Gantry Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Tumor: A Feasibility Study". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.09.053.
@article{osti_21436057,
title = {Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy Compared With Static Gantry Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Tumor: A Feasibility Study},
author = {Scorsetti, Marta and Bignardi, Mario and Clivio, Alessandro},
abstractNote = {Purpose: A planning study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), a volumetric modulated arc technique, on malignant pleural mesothelioma. The benchmark was conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: The computed tomography data sets of 6 patients were included. The plans for IMRT with nine fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with a single isocenter. All plans were optimized for 15-MV photon beams. The dose prescription was 54 Gy to the planning target volume. The planning objectives for the planning target volume were a minimal dose of >95% and maximal dose of <107%. For the organs at risk, the parameters were as follows: contralateral lung, percentage of volume receiving 5 Gy (V{sub 5Gy}) <60%, V{sub 20Gy} < 10%, mean <10.0 Gy; liver, V{sub 30Gy} <33%, mean <31 Gy; heart, V{sub 45Gy} <30%, V{sub 50Gy} <20%, dose received by 1% of the volume (D{sub 1%}) <60 Gy; contralateral kidney, V{sub 15Gy} <20%; spine, D{sub 1%} <45 Gy; esophagus, V{sub 55Gy} <30%; and spleen, V{sub 40Gy} <50%. The monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were scored to measure the treatment efficiency. The pretreatment portal dosimetry scored delivery to the calculation agreement with the Gamma Agreement Index. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity. Both techniques fulfilled objectives on organs at risk with a tendency of RA to improve sparing. The conformity index was 1.9 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT. The number of MU/2Gy was 734 {+-} 82 for RA and 2,195 {+-} 317 for IMRT. The planning vs. delivery agreement revealed a Gamma Agreement Index for IMRT of 96.0% {+-} 2.6% and for RA of 95.7% {+-} 1.5%. The treatment time was 3.7 {+-} 0.3min for RA and 13.4 {+-} 0.1min for IMRT. Conclusion: RA demonstrated compared with conventional IMRT, similar target coverage and better dose sparing to the organs at risks. The number of MUs and the time required to deliver a 2-Gy fraction were much lower for RA, allowing the possibility to incorporate this technique in the treatment options for mesothelioma patients.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.09.053},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving {>=}95% or at mostmore » 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving {>=}5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%-30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 {+-} 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 {+-} 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 {+-} 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 {+-} 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 {+-} 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving {>=}20 Gy ranged from 23.6% {+-} 9.1% to 21.1% {+-} 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% {+-} 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 {+-} 139, 322 {+-} 20, and 387 {+-} 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a {approx}20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different gantry speeds). Conclusion: RA demonstrated, compared with conventional IMRT, a similar target coverage and some better dose sparing to the organs at risk; the advantage against conventional 3D-CRT was more evident. RA with FFF beams resulted in minor improvements in plan quality but with the potential for additional useful reduction in the treatment time.« less
  • Purpose: In patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are unable to undergo pneumonectomy, it is difficult to deliver tumoricidal radiation doses to the pleura without significant toxicity. We have implemented a technique of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat these patients, and we report the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 36 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma and two intact lungs (i.e., no previous pneumonectomy) were treated with pleural IMRT to the hemithorax (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 41.4-50.4) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results: Of the 36 patients, 56% had right-sided tumors.more » The histologic type was epithelial in 78%, sarcomatoid in 6%, and mixed in 17%, and 6% had Stage I, 28% had Stage II, 33% had Stage III, and 33% had Stage IV. Thirty-two patients (89%) received induction chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and pemetrexed); 56% underwent pleurectomy/decortication before IMRT and 44% did not undergo resection. Of the 36 patients evaluable for acute toxicity, 7 (20%) had Grade 3 or worse pneumonitis (including 1 death) and 2 had Grade 3 fatigue. In 30 patients assessable for late toxicity, 5 had continuing Grade 3 pneumonitis. For patients treated with surgery, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 75% and 53%, and the median survival was 26 months. For patients who did not undergo surgical resection, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 69% and 28%, and the median survival was 17 months. Conclusions: Treating the intact lung with pleural IMRT in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma is a safe and feasible treatment option with an acceptable rate of pneumonitis. Additionally, the survival rates were encouraging in our retrospective series, particularly for the patients who underwent pleurectomy/decortication. We have initiated a Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin with or without pleurectomy/decortication, followed by pleural IMRT to prospectively evaluate the toxicity and survival.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence of fatal pulmonary events after extrapleural pneumonectomy and hemithoracic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 63 consecutive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who underwent extrapleural pneumonectomy and IMRT at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The endpoints studied were pulmonary-related death (PRD) and non-cancer-related death within 6 months of IMRT. Results: Of the 63 patients, 23 (37%) had died within 6 months of IMRT (10 of recurrent cancer, 6 of pulmonary causes [pneumonia in 4 and pneumonitis in 2], and 7 of othermore » noncancer causes [pulmonary embolus in 2, sepsis after bronchopleural fistula in 1, and cause unknown but without pulmonary symptoms or recurrent disease in 4]). On univariate analysis, the factors that predicted for PRD were a lower preoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.021), absolute volume of lung spared at 10 Gy (p = 0.025), percentage of lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}; p 0.002), and mean lung dose (p = 0.013). On multivariate analysis, only V{sub 20} was predictive of PRD (p = 0.017; odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.08) or non-cancer-related death (p = 0.033; odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.45). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that fatal pulmonary toxicities were associated with radiation to the contralateral lung. V{sub 20} was the only independent determinant for risk of PRD or non-cancer-related death. The mean V{sub 20} of the non-PRD patients was considerably lower than that accepted during standard thoracic radiotherapy, implying that the V{sub 20} should be kept as low as possible after extrapleural pneumonectomy.« less
  • Purpose: The optimal technique for postoperative radiotherapy (RT) after extrapleural pleuropneumonectomy (EPP) of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) remains debated. Methods and Materials: The data from 8 right-sided and 9 left-sided consecutive cases of MPM treated with RT after radical EPP were reviewed. Of the 17 patients, 8 had been treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal RT (3D-CRT) and 9 with intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) with 6-MV photons. The clinical outcome and adverse events were assessed. For comparative planning, each case was replanned with 3D-CRT using photons and electrons or with IMRT. Homogeneity, doses to the organs at risk, and target volume coveragemore » were analyzed. Results: Both techniques yielded acceptable plans. The dose coverage and homogeneity of IMRT increased by 7.7% for the first planning target volume and 9.7% for the second planning target volume, ensuring {>=}95% of the prescribed dose compared with 3D-CRT (p < 0.01). Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT increased the dose to the contralateral lung, with an increase in the mean lung dose of 7.8 Gy and an increase in the volume receiving 13 Gy and 20 Gy by 20.5% and 7.2%, respectively (p < 0.01). A negligible dose increase to the contralateral kidney and liver was observed. No differences were seen for the spinal cord and ipsilateral kidney. Two adverse events of clinical relevant lung toxicity were observed with IMRT. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated RT and 3D-CRT are both suitable for adjuvant RT. IMRT improves the planning target volume coverage but delivered greater doses to the organs at risk. Rigid dose constraints for the lung should be respected.« less
  • The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic–based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for themore » different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15 mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT.« less