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Title: Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed

Abstract

The incineration of MSW in fluidized beds is a commonly applied waste management practice. The composition of the ashes produced in a fluidized bed boiler has important environmental implications as potentially toxic trace elements may be associated with ash particles and it is therefore essential to determine the mechanisms controlling the association of trace elements to ash particles, including the role of major element composition. The research presented here uses micro-analytical techniques to study the distribution of major and trace elements and determine the importance of affinity-based binding mechanisms in separate cyclone ash particles from MSW combustion. Particle size and the occurrence of Ca and Fe were found to be important factors for the binding of trace elements to ash particles, but the binding largely depends on random associations based on the presence of a particle when trace elements condensate in the flue gas.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)
  2. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Division of Water Environment Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Sven Hultins Gata 8, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21357684
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Waste Management; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.wasman.2009.09.012; PII: S0956-053X(09)00366-3; Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ASHES; COMBUSTION; CONDENSATES; FLUE GAS; FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS; FLUIDIZED BEDS; PARTICLE SIZE; RANDOMNESS; TOXICITY; TRACE AMOUNTS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; BOILERS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; GASEOUS WASTES; MANAGEMENT; OXIDATION; RESIDUES; SIZE; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; WASTES

Citation Formats

Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s, Rauch, S., Cho, P., and Steenari, B.-M.. Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2009.09.012.
Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s, Rauch, S., Cho, P., & Steenari, B.-M.. Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed. United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2009.09.012.
Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s, Rauch, S., Cho, P., and Steenari, B.-M.. 2010. "Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed". United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2009.09.012.
@article{osti_21357684,
title = {Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed},
author = {Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s and Rauch, S. and Cho, P. and Steenari, B.-M.},
abstractNote = {The incineration of MSW in fluidized beds is a commonly applied waste management practice. The composition of the ashes produced in a fluidized bed boiler has important environmental implications as potentially toxic trace elements may be associated with ash particles and it is therefore essential to determine the mechanisms controlling the association of trace elements to ash particles, including the role of major element composition. The research presented here uses micro-analytical techniques to study the distribution of major and trace elements and determine the importance of affinity-based binding mechanisms in separate cyclone ash particles from MSW combustion. Particle size and the occurrence of Ca and Fe were found to be important factors for the binding of trace elements to ash particles, but the binding largely depends on random associations based on the presence of a particle when trace elements condensate in the flue gas.},
doi = {10.1016/j.wasman.2009.09.012},
journal = {Waste Management},
number = 7,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 7
}
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