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Title: Optical properties of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} thin films

Abstract

Thin films of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} on glass substrates were prepared from solution by dip coating and then sulfurized in H{sub 2}S (H{sub 2}S:Ar = 1:10) atmosphere. The films had an average thickness of 60 nm and were characterized by X-ray diffraction studies, scanning electron microscopy, EDAX, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The influence of annealing temperature (150-300 deg. C) on the crystallinity and particle size was studied. The effect of CTAB as a capping agent has been tested. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the polycrystalline nature of the films with a preferential orientation along the c-axis. Optical transmission spectra indicated a marked blue shift of the absorption edge due to quantum confinement and optical band gap was found to vary from 3.5 to 3.0 eV with annealing temperature. Raman studies indicated a prominent broad peak at {approx}314 cm{sup -1}, which confirmed the presence of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} phase.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India)
  2. Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Athens GR157 80 (Greece)
  3. Microelectronics Group, School of Electronic Engineering, The Queen's University, Belfast BT71NN (United Kingdom)
  4. Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India). E-mail: mssc2@iacs.res.in
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21000611
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Research Bulletin; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.materresbull.2006.06.028; PII: S0025-5408(06)00285-6; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABSORPTION; ANNEALING; DIP COATING; GLASS; NANOSTRUCTURES; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; PARTICLE SIZE; POLYCRYSTALS; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SUBSTRATES; THICKNESS; THIN FILMS; TIN SULFIDES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Panda, S.K., Antonakos, A., Liarokapis, E., Bhattacharya, S., and Chaudhuri, S. Optical properties of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} thin films. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.materresbull.2006.06.028.
Panda, S.K., Antonakos, A., Liarokapis, E., Bhattacharya, S., & Chaudhuri, S. Optical properties of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} thin films. United States. doi:10.1016/j.materresbull.2006.06.028.
Panda, S.K., Antonakos, A., Liarokapis, E., Bhattacharya, S., and Chaudhuri, S. Thu . "Optical properties of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} thin films". United States. doi:10.1016/j.materresbull.2006.06.028.
@article{osti_21000611,
title = {Optical properties of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} thin films},
author = {Panda, S.K. and Antonakos, A. and Liarokapis, E. and Bhattacharya, S. and Chaudhuri, S.},
abstractNote = {Thin films of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} on glass substrates were prepared from solution by dip coating and then sulfurized in H{sub 2}S (H{sub 2}S:Ar = 1:10) atmosphere. The films had an average thickness of 60 nm and were characterized by X-ray diffraction studies, scanning electron microscopy, EDAX, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The influence of annealing temperature (150-300 deg. C) on the crystallinity and particle size was studied. The effect of CTAB as a capping agent has been tested. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the polycrystalline nature of the films with a preferential orientation along the c-axis. Optical transmission spectra indicated a marked blue shift of the absorption edge due to quantum confinement and optical band gap was found to vary from 3.5 to 3.0 eV with annealing temperature. Raman studies indicated a prominent broad peak at {approx}314 cm{sup -1}, which confirmed the presence of nanocrystalline SnS{sub 2} phase.},
doi = {10.1016/j.materresbull.2006.06.028},
journal = {Materials Research Bulletin},
number = 3,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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