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Title: Neuronal oxidative injury and dendritic damage induced by carbofuran: Protection by memantine

Abstract

Carbamate insecticides mediate their neurotoxicity by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inactivation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats acutely intoxicated with the carbamate insecticide carbofuran (1.5 mg/kg, sc) developed hypercholinergic signs within 5-7 min of exposure, with maximal severity characterized by seizures within 30-60 min, lasting for about 2 h. At the time of peak severity, compared with controls, AChE was maximally inhibited (by 82-90%), radical oxygen species (ROS) markers (F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, F{sub 2}-IsoPs; and F{sub 4}-neuroprostanes, F{sub 4}-NeuroPs) were elevated 2- to 3-fold, and the radical nitrogen species (RNS) marker citrulline was elevated 4- to 8-fold in discrete brain regions (cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus). In addition, levels of high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were significantly reduced (ATP, by 43-56%; and phosphocreatine, by 37-48%). Values of total adenine nucleotides and total creatine compounds declined markedly (by 41-56% and 35-45%, respectively), while energy charge potential remained unchanged. Quantitative morphometric analysis of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region revealed significant decreases in dendritic lengths (by 64%) and spine density (by 60%). Pretreatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine (18 mg/kg, sc), in combination with atropine sulfate (16 mg/kg, sc), significantly attenuated carbofuran-induced changes in AChE activity and levels of F{sub 2}-IsoPs and F{sub 4}-NeuroPs, declines in HEPs, asmore » well as the alterations in morphology of hippocampal neurons. MEM and ATS pretreatment also protected rats from carbofuran-induced hypercholinergic behavioral activity, including seizures. These findings support the involvement of ROS and RNS in seizure-induced neuronal injury and suggest that memantine by preventing carbofuran-induced neuronal hyperactivity blocks pathways associated with oxidative damage in neurons.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Toxicology Department, Murray State University, Breathitt Veterinary Center, P.O. Box 2000, 715 North Drive, Hopkinsville, KY 42240-2000 (United States). E-mail: ramesh.gupta@murraystate.edu
  2. Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976873
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 219; Journal Issue: 2-3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.028; PII: S0041-008X(06)00408-X; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADENINES; ATP; ATROPINE; CARBAMATES; CITRULLINE; CREATINE; DAMAGE; DENDRITES; ELECTROMECHANICS; HIPPOCAMPUS; INJURIES; INSECTICIDES; MORPHOLOGY; NERVE CELLS; OXIDATION; PHOSPHATES; PHOSPHOCREATINE; RATS; RECEPTORS; VERTEBRAE

Citation Formats

Gupta, Ramesh C., Milatovic, Snjezana, Dettbarn, Wolf-D., Aschner, Michael, and Milatovic, Dejan. Neuronal oxidative injury and dendritic damage induced by carbofuran: Protection by memantine. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.028.
Gupta, Ramesh C., Milatovic, Snjezana, Dettbarn, Wolf-D., Aschner, Michael, & Milatovic, Dejan. Neuronal oxidative injury and dendritic damage induced by carbofuran: Protection by memantine. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.028.
Gupta, Ramesh C., Milatovic, Snjezana, Dettbarn, Wolf-D., Aschner, Michael, and Milatovic, Dejan. Thu . "Neuronal oxidative injury and dendritic damage induced by carbofuran: Protection by memantine". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.028.
@article{osti_20976873,
title = {Neuronal oxidative injury and dendritic damage induced by carbofuran: Protection by memantine},
author = {Gupta, Ramesh C. and Milatovic, Snjezana and Dettbarn, Wolf-D. and Aschner, Michael and Milatovic, Dejan},
abstractNote = {Carbamate insecticides mediate their neurotoxicity by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inactivation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats acutely intoxicated with the carbamate insecticide carbofuran (1.5 mg/kg, sc) developed hypercholinergic signs within 5-7 min of exposure, with maximal severity characterized by seizures within 30-60 min, lasting for about 2 h. At the time of peak severity, compared with controls, AChE was maximally inhibited (by 82-90%), radical oxygen species (ROS) markers (F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, F{sub 2}-IsoPs; and F{sub 4}-neuroprostanes, F{sub 4}-NeuroPs) were elevated 2- to 3-fold, and the radical nitrogen species (RNS) marker citrulline was elevated 4- to 8-fold in discrete brain regions (cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus). In addition, levels of high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were significantly reduced (ATP, by 43-56%; and phosphocreatine, by 37-48%). Values of total adenine nucleotides and total creatine compounds declined markedly (by 41-56% and 35-45%, respectively), while energy charge potential remained unchanged. Quantitative morphometric analysis of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region revealed significant decreases in dendritic lengths (by 64%) and spine density (by 60%). Pretreatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine (18 mg/kg, sc), in combination with atropine sulfate (16 mg/kg, sc), significantly attenuated carbofuran-induced changes in AChE activity and levels of F{sub 2}-IsoPs and F{sub 4}-NeuroPs, declines in HEPs, as well as the alterations in morphology of hippocampal neurons. MEM and ATS pretreatment also protected rats from carbofuran-induced hypercholinergic behavioral activity, including seizures. These findings support the involvement of ROS and RNS in seizure-induced neuronal injury and suggest that memantine by preventing carbofuran-induced neuronal hyperactivity blocks pathways associated with oxidative damage in neurons.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2006.10.028},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 2-3,
volume = 219,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from ourmore » in vitro study showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 {mu}M) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F{sub 2}-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 {mu}g/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F{sub 2}-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional dopaminergic transmission and slowing of the progression of Mn-induced neurodegenerative processes. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn exposure leads to neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents attenuate Mn-induced oxidative injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These agents also protect the striatal neurons from dendritic atrophy and spine loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These prophylactic strategies may be effective against Mn neurotoxicity.« less
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