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Title: New diamond cell for single-crystal x-ray diffraction

Abstract

A new design for a high-precision diamond cell is described. Two kinematically mounted steel disks are elastically deflected to generate pressure. This principle provides higher precision in the diamond anvil alignment than most sliding piston-cylinder or guide-pin devices at significantly lower cost. With this new diamond cell conical diamond anvils with an x-ray aperture of 85 degree sign were successfully tested to over 50 GPa using helium as a pressure medium. Anvil thickness of less than 1.4 mm provides high x-ray transmission and low background, a significant improvement compared to beryllium or diamond-disk backing plates. Because the diamond anvils are supported by tungsten carbide seats, samples and pressure media can be annealed by external or laser heating to provide hydrostatic pressure conditions.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Max-Planck Institut fuer Chemie, Postfach 3060, D-55020 Mainz (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20861501
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2372734; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACCURACY; APERTURES; BERYLLIUM; DESIGN; DIAMONDS; HELIUM; LASER-RADIATION HEATING; MONOCRYSTALS; PISTONS; PRESSURE RANGE GIGA PA; STEELS; THICKNESS; TUNGSTEN CARBIDES; X RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY DIFFRACTOMETERS

Citation Formats

Boehler, Reinhard. New diamond cell for single-crystal x-ray diffraction. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2372734.
Boehler, Reinhard. New diamond cell for single-crystal x-ray diffraction. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2372734.
Boehler, Reinhard. 2006. "New diamond cell for single-crystal x-ray diffraction". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2372734.
@article{osti_20861501,
title = {New diamond cell for single-crystal x-ray diffraction},
author = {Boehler, Reinhard},
abstractNote = {A new design for a high-precision diamond cell is described. Two kinematically mounted steel disks are elastically deflected to generate pressure. This principle provides higher precision in the diamond anvil alignment than most sliding piston-cylinder or guide-pin devices at significantly lower cost. With this new diamond cell conical diamond anvils with an x-ray aperture of 85 degree sign were successfully tested to over 50 GPa using helium as a pressure medium. Anvil thickness of less than 1.4 mm provides high x-ray transmission and low background, a significant improvement compared to beryllium or diamond-disk backing plates. Because the diamond anvils are supported by tungsten carbide seats, samples and pressure media can be annealed by external or laser heating to provide hydrostatic pressure conditions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2372734},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 11,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month =
}
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