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Title: Influence of sintering temperatures on hardness and Young's modulus of tricalcium phosphate bioceramic by nanoindentation technique

Abstract

Nanoindentation experiments on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramic sintered at different temperatures were performed with a Berkovich indenter for determining hardness and elastic modulus from load and displacement data. The hardness and Young's modulus increased with the increase of sintering temperature up to 1300 deg. C, but the Young's modulus decreased with the further increase of sintering temperatures at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the transformation {beta}{yields}{alpha}-TCP happened when the sintering temperature reached around 1400 deg. C, which contributed to the decreases of modulus at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that the sintering effect was improved with the increase in sintering temperature.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. School of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore). E-mail: c.wang@bham.ac.uk
  2. Center for Development of Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 Sichuan (China)
  3. School of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20748636
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Characterization; Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 4-5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.matchar.2004.06.007; PII: S1044-5803(04)00135-4; Copyright (c) 2004 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CALCIUM PHOSPHATES; HARDNESS; NANOSTRUCTURES; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SINTERING; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; YOUNG MODULUS

Citation Formats

Wang, C.X., Zhou, X., and Wang, M. Influence of sintering temperatures on hardness and Young's modulus of tricalcium phosphate bioceramic by nanoindentation technique. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2004.06.007.
Wang, C.X., Zhou, X., & Wang, M. Influence of sintering temperatures on hardness and Young's modulus of tricalcium phosphate bioceramic by nanoindentation technique. United States. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2004.06.007.
Wang, C.X., Zhou, X., and Wang, M. 2004. "Influence of sintering temperatures on hardness and Young's modulus of tricalcium phosphate bioceramic by nanoindentation technique". United States. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2004.06.007.
@article{osti_20748636,
title = {Influence of sintering temperatures on hardness and Young's modulus of tricalcium phosphate bioceramic by nanoindentation technique},
author = {Wang, C.X. and Zhou, X. and Wang, M.},
abstractNote = {Nanoindentation experiments on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramic sintered at different temperatures were performed with a Berkovich indenter for determining hardness and elastic modulus from load and displacement data. The hardness and Young's modulus increased with the increase of sintering temperature up to 1300 deg. C, but the Young's modulus decreased with the further increase of sintering temperatures at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the transformation {beta}{yields}{alpha}-TCP happened when the sintering temperature reached around 1400 deg. C, which contributed to the decreases of modulus at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that the sintering effect was improved with the increase in sintering temperature.},
doi = {10.1016/j.matchar.2004.06.007},
journal = {Materials Characterization},
number = 4-5,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month = 7
}
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