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Title: Cummins Electric Truck with Range-Extending Engine (ETREE) Project Final Technical Report

Abstract

The Cummins Electric Truck with Range Extending Engine (ETREE) program designed, developed, and demonstrated a range extending electric vehicle that employs an electrified propulsion system installed in a class 6 commercial vehicle (Peterbilt 220). The program objectives were: Objective 1: To develop and demonstrate a range extending electric truck that can meet the target objective of 50% reduction in fuel consumption compared to a conventional class 6 commercial vehicle over a wide variety of class 6 drive cycles. Objective 2: To demonstrate good drivability and performance as well as the ability to accomplish all typical missions in various environmental conditions of a conventional class 6 commercial vehicle. This project was relevant to industry and the greater public because at the time of the project there were two keys to widespread electrified commercial vehicle adoption yet to be realize: For pure electrified vehicle adoption, battery improvements are needed: Cost must decrease, and energy density must increase. Electric vehicles must overcome fleet operator risks such as: operations in cold climates, hilly terrain, or where majority of conventional trucks are replaced with electrified vehicles. In the near to medium term these adoption hurdles were address by the objectives of this project. A plug-inmore » hybrid vehicle that could be operated in all electric mode for most of its workday optimizing the use of grid energy with the ability to supplement energy demand with the onboard range extending engine. This project’s architecture provided ability to match a conventional class 6 commercial vehicle range and performance characteristics prior to the ubiquitous adoption of battery electric vehicle charging infrastructure as well. Additionally, the vehicles produced as part of this project can be considered a prototype for a commercially viable heavily electrified commercial vehicle because most of the physical hardware used for the project is commercially available in the market today. The ETREE program met its main objectives and demonstrated 65% fuel consumption reduction as compared to a conventional class 6 vehicle while meeting performance and range expectations. This was achieved by drawing upon the strengths of the assembled team: Cummins, PACCAR, the Ohio State University, Argonne National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
CUMMINS INC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Transportation Office. Vehicle Technologies Office
Contributing Org.:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory , PACCAR, the Ohio State University, Argonne National Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
1741039
Report Number(s):
DOE-CMI-07514
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0007514
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS

Citation Formats

Dalton, Jesse C. Cummins Electric Truck with Range-Extending Engine (ETREE) Project Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1741039.
Dalton, Jesse C. Cummins Electric Truck with Range-Extending Engine (ETREE) Project Final Technical Report. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1741039
Dalton, Jesse C. 2020. "Cummins Electric Truck with Range-Extending Engine (ETREE) Project Final Technical Report". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1741039. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1741039.
@article{osti_1741039,
title = {Cummins Electric Truck with Range-Extending Engine (ETREE) Project Final Technical Report},
author = {Dalton, Jesse C},
abstractNote = {The Cummins Electric Truck with Range Extending Engine (ETREE) program designed, developed, and demonstrated a range extending electric vehicle that employs an electrified propulsion system installed in a class 6 commercial vehicle (Peterbilt 220). The program objectives were: Objective 1: To develop and demonstrate a range extending electric truck that can meet the target objective of 50% reduction in fuel consumption compared to a conventional class 6 commercial vehicle over a wide variety of class 6 drive cycles. Objective 2: To demonstrate good drivability and performance as well as the ability to accomplish all typical missions in various environmental conditions of a conventional class 6 commercial vehicle. This project was relevant to industry and the greater public because at the time of the project there were two keys to widespread electrified commercial vehicle adoption yet to be realize: For pure electrified vehicle adoption, battery improvements are needed: Cost must decrease, and energy density must increase. Electric vehicles must overcome fleet operator risks such as: operations in cold climates, hilly terrain, or where majority of conventional trucks are replaced with electrified vehicles. In the near to medium term these adoption hurdles were address by the objectives of this project. A plug-in hybrid vehicle that could be operated in all electric mode for most of its workday optimizing the use of grid energy with the ability to supplement energy demand with the onboard range extending engine. This project’s architecture provided ability to match a conventional class 6 commercial vehicle range and performance characteristics prior to the ubiquitous adoption of battery electric vehicle charging infrastructure as well. Additionally, the vehicles produced as part of this project can be considered a prototype for a commercially viable heavily electrified commercial vehicle because most of the physical hardware used for the project is commercially available in the market today. The ETREE program met its main objectives and demonstrated 65% fuel consumption reduction as compared to a conventional class 6 vehicle while meeting performance and range expectations. This was achieved by drawing upon the strengths of the assembled team: Cummins, PACCAR, the Ohio State University, Argonne National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.},
doi = {10.2172/1741039},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1741039}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {12}
}