skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Modeling the Impact of Flexible CHP on the Future Electric Grid In California

Abstract

Combined heat and power (CHP) systems provide electricity and process heat at more than 4,400 industrial and commercial facilities across the United States. Typically fueled with natural gas, a CHP system combines a prime mover (such as a reciprocating engine) with a generator and heat recovery equipment, allowing operation at very high efficiencies (65–85%). Traditionally, CHP systems have been configured to serve local electrical and thermal loads at the sites where they are deployed. Units are sized to ensure a high capacity factor for the equipment, and the electricity generated tends to be used on site. CHP units in the United States already generate over 12% of the nation’s electricity. However, CHP’s potential benefits could be much greater if power generated could be used beyond the site, because the analysis was performed under the assumption that sites could use all the thermal output. Analysis of a few key sectors confirmed that this assumption is valid (for more information, see Appendix E). Those benefits could include improved grid reliability and resilience, as well as lower-cost options for providing energy and other grid services. The potential benefits also align well with grid modernization objectives, as shown in Combined heat and power (CHP)more » systems provide electricity and process heat at more than 4,400 industrial and commercial facilities across the United States., and greater electrification of loads, driven by carbon reduction priorities.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [5];  [5]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Resource Dynamics Corp., McLean, VA (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)
  5. Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1649545
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2019/1259
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Desai, Jal, Ruth, Mark, Lemar, Paul, Bhandari, Mahabir S., Storey, John, Srivastava, Kiran, Rogers, Jonathan, and Schwartz, Harrison. Modeling the Impact of Flexible CHP on the Future Electric Grid In California. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1649545.
Desai, Jal, Ruth, Mark, Lemar, Paul, Bhandari, Mahabir S., Storey, John, Srivastava, Kiran, Rogers, Jonathan, & Schwartz, Harrison. Modeling the Impact of Flexible CHP on the Future Electric Grid In California. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1649545
Desai, Jal, Ruth, Mark, Lemar, Paul, Bhandari, Mahabir S., Storey, John, Srivastava, Kiran, Rogers, Jonathan, and Schwartz, Harrison. 2020. "Modeling the Impact of Flexible CHP on the Future Electric Grid In California". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1649545. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1649545.
@article{osti_1649545,
title = {Modeling the Impact of Flexible CHP on the Future Electric Grid In California},
author = {Desai, Jal and Ruth, Mark and Lemar, Paul and Bhandari, Mahabir S. and Storey, John and Srivastava, Kiran and Rogers, Jonathan and Schwartz, Harrison},
abstractNote = {Combined heat and power (CHP) systems provide electricity and process heat at more than 4,400 industrial and commercial facilities across the United States. Typically fueled with natural gas, a CHP system combines a prime mover (such as a reciprocating engine) with a generator and heat recovery equipment, allowing operation at very high efficiencies (65–85%). Traditionally, CHP systems have been configured to serve local electrical and thermal loads at the sites where they are deployed. Units are sized to ensure a high capacity factor for the equipment, and the electricity generated tends to be used on site. CHP units in the United States already generate over 12% of the nation’s electricity. However, CHP’s potential benefits could be much greater if power generated could be used beyond the site, because the analysis was performed under the assumption that sites could use all the thermal output. Analysis of a few key sectors confirmed that this assumption is valid (for more information, see Appendix E). Those benefits could include improved grid reliability and resilience, as well as lower-cost options for providing energy and other grid services. The potential benefits also align well with grid modernization objectives, as shown in Combined heat and power (CHP) systems provide electricity and process heat at more than 4,400 industrial and commercial facilities across the United States., and greater electrification of loads, driven by carbon reduction priorities.},
doi = {10.2172/1649545},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1649545}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {8}
}