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Title: Lesson Learned from Technical and Economic Performance Assessment and Benefit Evaluation of CHP-FCS

Abstract

Recent efforts and interest in combined heat and power (CHP) have increased with the momentum provided by the federal government support for penetration of CHP systems. Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and utilize the heat normally wasted in power generation for useful heating or cooling with lower emissions compared to alternative sources. A recent study investigated the utilization of CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50KWe in various commercial building types and geographic locations. Electricity, heating, and water heating demands were obtained from simulation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial reference building models for various building types. Utility rates, cost of equipment, and system efficiency were used to examine economic payback in different scenarios. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, CHP-FCSs are more expensive than alternative technologies, and the high capital cost of the CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than is typically acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, the installation of these units as on-site power generators also provide several other benefits that make them attractive to building owners and operators. The business case for CHP-FCSs can be made more financially attractivemore » through the provision of government incentives and when installed to support strategic infrastructure, such as military installations or data centers. The results presented in this paper intend to provide policy makers with information to define more customized incentives and tax credits based on a sample of building types and geographic locations in order to attract more business investment in this new technology.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1178513
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-101459
HT0800000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2014 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. The Next Generation: Reaching for High Energy Savings, August 17-22, 2014, Pacific Grove, California, 3-207 - 3-218
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Makhmalbaf, Atefe, Brooks, Kriston P., Srivastava, Viraj, Pilli, Siva Prasad, and Foster, Nikolas AF. Lesson Learned from Technical and Economic Performance Assessment and Benefit Evaluation of CHP-FCS. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Makhmalbaf, Atefe, Brooks, Kriston P., Srivastava, Viraj, Pilli, Siva Prasad, & Foster, Nikolas AF. Lesson Learned from Technical and Economic Performance Assessment and Benefit Evaluation of CHP-FCS. United States.
Makhmalbaf, Atefe, Brooks, Kriston P., Srivastava, Viraj, Pilli, Siva Prasad, and Foster, Nikolas AF. 2014. "Lesson Learned from Technical and Economic Performance Assessment and Benefit Evaluation of CHP-FCS". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1178513,
title = {Lesson Learned from Technical and Economic Performance Assessment and Benefit Evaluation of CHP-FCS},
author = {Makhmalbaf, Atefe and Brooks, Kriston P. and Srivastava, Viraj and Pilli, Siva Prasad and Foster, Nikolas AF},
abstractNote = {Recent efforts and interest in combined heat and power (CHP) have increased with the momentum provided by the federal government support for penetration of CHP systems. Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and utilize the heat normally wasted in power generation for useful heating or cooling with lower emissions compared to alternative sources. A recent study investigated the utilization of CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50KWe in various commercial building types and geographic locations. Electricity, heating, and water heating demands were obtained from simulation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial reference building models for various building types. Utility rates, cost of equipment, and system efficiency were used to examine economic payback in different scenarios. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, CHP-FCSs are more expensive than alternative technologies, and the high capital cost of the CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than is typically acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, the installation of these units as on-site power generators also provide several other benefits that make them attractive to building owners and operators. The business case for CHP-FCSs can be made more financially attractive through the provision of government incentives and when installed to support strategic infrastructure, such as military installations or data centers. The results presented in this paper intend to provide policy makers with information to define more customized incentives and tax credits based on a sample of building types and geographic locations in order to attract more business investment in this new technology.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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