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Title: Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant (Final Technical Report)

Abstract

The goal of this final project report is to comprehensively summarize the work conducted on project DE-FE0007395. In accordance with the Project Management Plan (PMP), Revision F dated 5/10/2019, and Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) within, the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) (Recipient) has successfully demonstrated a unique, versatile CO2 capture system (CCS) using a heat integrated process combined with two-stage stripping for process intensification, heat recovery and demineralized (DM) water generation. This project involved the design, fabrication, installation, testing of and data analysis from the UK CAER 0.7 MWe small pilot scale CO2 capture process installed at Kentucky Utilities (KU) E.W. Brown Generating Station in Harrodsburg, KY. During each of the four project Budget Periods (BPs), UK CAER met all project deliverables, all project milestones, with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) approved adjustments made to the campaign long-term hours during BP4. The CCS was constructed in modular skids. Two solvent campaigns were initially conducted; the first with a 30 wt% monoethanolamine (MEA) as a baseline, and the second with the Hitachi H3-1 advanced solvent. Additional tests were performed with two advanced solvents including CAER and Proprietary Solvent C. Short-period testing with a higher concentrationmore » of 40 wt% MEA was conducted to evaluate the potential saving with high alkalinity. From the various solvent campaigns, unique aspects of the UK CAER CCS technology, as well as its flexibility and versatility were experimentally validated and demonstrated. With respect to solvent evaluation efforts in identifying candidates with significant operational and capital cost savings potential, performance of solvents were evaluated to determine the energy requirements for regeneration; environmental impacts from secondary emissions and degradation products; degradation rates, solvent make-up rates and stability. The assessments were done from parametric tests that determined optimum operating conditions for the individual solvents to maximize process efficiency and minimize the parasitic load of the power plant, and from long term campaigns (1000 hours for 30 wt% MEA and 1000 hours for H3-1) which collectively informed the techno-economic analyses (TEA) of the process. The long term campaigns included corrosion studies which used three types of metal coupons in different sections of the process: (absorber, primary stripper, lean carbon-loaded and rich carbon loaded flow streams in process) to mimic heat and flow dynamics process equipment were exposed to. The estimated corrosion rates were used to elucidate corrosion mechanisms and to further guide process material selection for potential capital cost savings.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)
  2. Smith Management Group, Lexington, KY (United States)
  3. Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Smith Management Group, Lexington, KY (United States); Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1635102
Report Number(s):
DOE/FE0007395-4
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0007395
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; heat integration; carbon dioxide capture; solvent management; power generation; efficiency improvement; power plant; carbon management; gas separation; corrosion; solvent development; CO2; carbon capture and storage; combustion; flue gas; scrubber; stripper; pilot plant; slipstream; CO2 capture; mass transfer; kinetics; acid gas absorption

Citation Formats

Liu, Kunlei, Nikolic, Heather, Thompson, Jesse, Frimpong, Reynolds, Richburg, Lisa, Abad, Keemia, Bhatnagar, Saloni, Irvin, Bradley, Landon, James, Li, Wei, Matin, Naser Seyed, Pelgen, Jonathan, Placido, Andrew, Whitney, Clayton, Bhown, Abhoyjit, and Du, Yang. Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant (Final Technical Report). United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1635102.
Liu, Kunlei, Nikolic, Heather, Thompson, Jesse, Frimpong, Reynolds, Richburg, Lisa, Abad, Keemia, Bhatnagar, Saloni, Irvin, Bradley, Landon, James, Li, Wei, Matin, Naser Seyed, Pelgen, Jonathan, Placido, Andrew, Whitney, Clayton, Bhown, Abhoyjit, & Du, Yang. Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant (Final Technical Report). United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1635102
Liu, Kunlei, Nikolic, Heather, Thompson, Jesse, Frimpong, Reynolds, Richburg, Lisa, Abad, Keemia, Bhatnagar, Saloni, Irvin, Bradley, Landon, James, Li, Wei, Matin, Naser Seyed, Pelgen, Jonathan, Placido, Andrew, Whitney, Clayton, Bhown, Abhoyjit, and Du, Yang. 2020. "Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant (Final Technical Report)". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1635102. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1635102.
@article{osti_1635102,
title = {Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant (Final Technical Report)},
author = {Liu, Kunlei and Nikolic, Heather and Thompson, Jesse and Frimpong, Reynolds and Richburg, Lisa and Abad, Keemia and Bhatnagar, Saloni and Irvin, Bradley and Landon, James and Li, Wei and Matin, Naser Seyed and Pelgen, Jonathan and Placido, Andrew and Whitney, Clayton and Bhown, Abhoyjit and Du, Yang},
abstractNote = {The goal of this final project report is to comprehensively summarize the work conducted on project DE-FE0007395. In accordance with the Project Management Plan (PMP), Revision F dated 5/10/2019, and Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) within, the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) (Recipient) has successfully demonstrated a unique, versatile CO2 capture system (CCS) using a heat integrated process combined with two-stage stripping for process intensification, heat recovery and demineralized (DM) water generation. This project involved the design, fabrication, installation, testing of and data analysis from the UK CAER 0.7 MWe small pilot scale CO2 capture process installed at Kentucky Utilities (KU) E.W. Brown Generating Station in Harrodsburg, KY. During each of the four project Budget Periods (BPs), UK CAER met all project deliverables, all project milestones, with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) approved adjustments made to the campaign long-term hours during BP4. The CCS was constructed in modular skids. Two solvent campaigns were initially conducted; the first with a 30 wt% monoethanolamine (MEA) as a baseline, and the second with the Hitachi H3-1 advanced solvent. Additional tests were performed with two advanced solvents including CAER and Proprietary Solvent C. Short-period testing with a higher concentration of 40 wt% MEA was conducted to evaluate the potential saving with high alkalinity. From the various solvent campaigns, unique aspects of the UK CAER CCS technology, as well as its flexibility and versatility were experimentally validated and demonstrated. With respect to solvent evaluation efforts in identifying candidates with significant operational and capital cost savings potential, performance of solvents were evaluated to determine the energy requirements for regeneration; environmental impacts from secondary emissions and degradation products; degradation rates, solvent make-up rates and stability. The assessments were done from parametric tests that determined optimum operating conditions for the individual solvents to maximize process efficiency and minimize the parasitic load of the power plant, and from long term campaigns (1000 hours for 30 wt% MEA and 1000 hours for H3-1) which collectively informed the techno-economic analyses (TEA) of the process. The long term campaigns included corrosion studies which used three types of metal coupons in different sections of the process: (absorber, primary stripper, lean carbon-loaded and rich carbon loaded flow streams in process) to mimic heat and flow dynamics process equipment were exposed to. The estimated corrosion rates were used to elucidate corrosion mechanisms and to further guide process material selection for potential capital cost savings.},
doi = {10.2172/1635102},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1635102}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {6}
}