skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Basic Research Needs for Energy and Water: Report of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Basic Research Needs Workshop for Energy and Water

Abstract

Water is precious; it has no substitute as a vital resource. It is essential not only for life, but also for practically all forms of economic activity. The food we eat, the clothes we wear, the goods we use, and the electricity we consume all require water. Water — in both quantity and quality — is one of the world’s most critical resources. The global importance of water presents enormous opportunity for innovation spurred by basic science to better understand at a fundamental level energy, water, and their interrelationship. Energy-water systems, whether manufactured or part of the natural world, exhibit extraordinary dynamics and complexities. To make possible a transformation to a future where fundamental processes underlying energy-water systems are quantified and harnessed for societal benefits, understanding of the chemical processes and materials underlying the interdependence of energy and water must be advanced. These interdependent energy and water issues (energy-water issues) intersect with national and international priorities. The challenges we face for energy-water systems are, in fact, an opportunity to shape a sustainable future for the nation and the world and present an enormous opportunity for fundamental energy science. Basic research — spanning chemistry, physics, geosciences, biosciences, and materials sciences —more » is essential to answering many questions related to energy and water systems. It is now clear that ensuring robust and secure energy and water systems will require a significant basic scientific research effort. Science questions that underpin water resiliency and water-energy systems span 12 orders of magnitude in length scale, from the nature and implications of hydrogen bonding, to the state and movement of water through aquifers. Addressing challenging questions requires advances and integration of basic chemical, geological, biological, material, and computational sciences. Recognizing the tremendous scope and scale of basic research needs in the energy-water domain, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), sponsored a workshop on “Basic Research Needs for Energy and Water,” which was held near Washington, D.C., January 4–6, 2017. Attended by more than 100 leading national and international scientific experts in chemistry, physics, materials sciences, biosciences, and geosciences related to the energy-water system, the workshop addressed basic research necessary to improve water use for industrial applications and energy production and to increase fit-for-purpose water availability and energy efficiency as well as crosscutting scientific research needs. The workshop identified four Priority Research Directions (PRDs) that will lay the foundation to better understand materials and processes relevant to energy-water issues and harness their potential for technological impact.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [2];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [11];  [11];  [11];  [12];  [11]
  1. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  4. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  5. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
  6. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
  7. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  8. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)
  9. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
  10. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  11. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Basic Energy Sciences
  12. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC) (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1616296
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Tirrell, Matthew, Hubbard, Susan, Sholl, David, Peterson, Eric, Tsapatsis, Michael, Maher, Kate, Tumas, William, Giammar, Daniel, Gilbert, Benjamin, Loo, Yueh-Lin, Schoonen, Martin, Kung, Harriet, Garrett, Bruce, Horton, Linda, McLean, Gail, Darling, Seth, and Runkles, Katie. Basic Research Needs for Energy and Water: Report of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Basic Research Needs Workshop for Energy and Water. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1616296.
Tirrell, Matthew, Hubbard, Susan, Sholl, David, Peterson, Eric, Tsapatsis, Michael, Maher, Kate, Tumas, William, Giammar, Daniel, Gilbert, Benjamin, Loo, Yueh-Lin, Schoonen, Martin, Kung, Harriet, Garrett, Bruce, Horton, Linda, McLean, Gail, Darling, Seth, & Runkles, Katie. Basic Research Needs for Energy and Water: Report of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Basic Research Needs Workshop for Energy and Water. United States. doi:10.2172/1616296.
Tirrell, Matthew, Hubbard, Susan, Sholl, David, Peterson, Eric, Tsapatsis, Michael, Maher, Kate, Tumas, William, Giammar, Daniel, Gilbert, Benjamin, Loo, Yueh-Lin, Schoonen, Martin, Kung, Harriet, Garrett, Bruce, Horton, Linda, McLean, Gail, Darling, Seth, and Runkles, Katie. Wed . "Basic Research Needs for Energy and Water: Report of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Basic Research Needs Workshop for Energy and Water". United States. doi:10.2172/1616296. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1616296.
@article{osti_1616296,
title = {Basic Research Needs for Energy and Water: Report of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Basic Research Needs Workshop for Energy and Water},
author = {Tirrell, Matthew and Hubbard, Susan and Sholl, David and Peterson, Eric and Tsapatsis, Michael and Maher, Kate and Tumas, William and Giammar, Daniel and Gilbert, Benjamin and Loo, Yueh-Lin and Schoonen, Martin and Kung, Harriet and Garrett, Bruce and Horton, Linda and McLean, Gail and Darling, Seth and Runkles, Katie},
abstractNote = {Water is precious; it has no substitute as a vital resource. It is essential not only for life, but also for practically all forms of economic activity. The food we eat, the clothes we wear, the goods we use, and the electricity we consume all require water. Water — in both quantity and quality — is one of the world’s most critical resources. The global importance of water presents enormous opportunity for innovation spurred by basic science to better understand at a fundamental level energy, water, and their interrelationship. Energy-water systems, whether manufactured or part of the natural world, exhibit extraordinary dynamics and complexities. To make possible a transformation to a future where fundamental processes underlying energy-water systems are quantified and harnessed for societal benefits, understanding of the chemical processes and materials underlying the interdependence of energy and water must be advanced. These interdependent energy and water issues (energy-water issues) intersect with national and international priorities. The challenges we face for energy-water systems are, in fact, an opportunity to shape a sustainable future for the nation and the world and present an enormous opportunity for fundamental energy science. Basic research — spanning chemistry, physics, geosciences, biosciences, and materials sciences — is essential to answering many questions related to energy and water systems. It is now clear that ensuring robust and secure energy and water systems will require a significant basic scientific research effort. Science questions that underpin water resiliency and water-energy systems span 12 orders of magnitude in length scale, from the nature and implications of hydrogen bonding, to the state and movement of water through aquifers. Addressing challenging questions requires advances and integration of basic chemical, geological, biological, material, and computational sciences. Recognizing the tremendous scope and scale of basic research needs in the energy-water domain, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), sponsored a workshop on “Basic Research Needs for Energy and Water,” which was held near Washington, D.C., January 4–6, 2017. Attended by more than 100 leading national and international scientific experts in chemistry, physics, materials sciences, biosciences, and geosciences related to the energy-water system, the workshop addressed basic research necessary to improve water use for industrial applications and energy production and to increase fit-for-purpose water availability and energy efficiency as well as crosscutting scientific research needs. The workshop identified four Priority Research Directions (PRDs) that will lay the foundation to better understand materials and processes relevant to energy-water issues and harness their potential for technological impact.},
doi = {10.2172/1616296},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {1}
}