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Title: Impact of clays on the compressibility and permeability of sands during methane extraction from gas hydrate

Abstract

Background: The quantity of methane potentially recoverable from gas hydrate is large enough to motivate federally-supported production tests in several countries, which in turn motivates studies of reservoir production efficiency. Evaluating long-term production well viability involves modeling permeability evolution in the reservoir sediments around the production well because processes reducing the flow of gas into the production well also reduce the long-term economic viability of the well. Fine particles, such as clays, exist nearly ubiquitously in the permafrost and marine settings that typically host gas hydrate, and fines reacting to fluid flow by migrating and clogging pore throats can reduce flow toward the production well. Many fines are sensitive to variations in pore-fluid chemistry, swelling in reaction to in situ pore brine being displaced by fresh water liberated from hydrates during dissociation. Additionally, fine particles tend to collect at gas/water interfaces created by the multiphase flow of gas and water. Thus, as methane and fresh water flow from the hydrate-dissociation front toward the production well, fine particles in the reservoir sands, interbedded fine-grained layers and seal layers can be swelled, migrated (or both), potentially clogging pathways and limiting flow to the production well. Objective: This project provides a quantitative basismore » for reservoir models to account for the impact of clays and other fine-grained material (“fines”) on reservoir compressibility and permeability, two key factors controlling the flow of gas and fluids toward a production well. This overall objective is addressed through a combination of site-specific and more generalized, fundamental science goals: Site-specific measurement goals: quantify the change in compressibility and permeability due to the reaction of fines to pore-water freshening in sediment collected during gas hydrates research expeditions (2010 UBGH2 expedition offshore eastern Korea; 2015 NGHP-02 expedition offshore eastern India). Fundamental measurements on pure fines goal: distinguish between, and quantify, mechanisms for sediment compressibility and permeability change due to physical and chemical responses of fines to the flow of freshened pore water and gas:  Chemical response: quantify and catalog the sensitivity of pure fines (fines with only a single component, or “endmember” fines) to pore-water chemistry.  Physical response: quantify the link between fines migration and clogging during single and multiphase flow.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
Contributing Org.:
Louisiana State University
OSTI Identifier:
1558747
Report Number(s):
DE-FE00-28966
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0028966
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; hydrate, fines migration

Citation Formats

Jung, Jongwon. Impact of clays on the compressibility and permeability of sands during methane extraction from gas hydrate. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1558747.
Jung, Jongwon. Impact of clays on the compressibility and permeability of sands during methane extraction from gas hydrate. United States. doi:10.2172/1558747.
Jung, Jongwon. Sun . "Impact of clays on the compressibility and permeability of sands during methane extraction from gas hydrate". United States. doi:10.2172/1558747. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1558747.
@article{osti_1558747,
title = {Impact of clays on the compressibility and permeability of sands during methane extraction from gas hydrate},
author = {Jung, Jongwon},
abstractNote = {Background: The quantity of methane potentially recoverable from gas hydrate is large enough to motivate federally-supported production tests in several countries, which in turn motivates studies of reservoir production efficiency. Evaluating long-term production well viability involves modeling permeability evolution in the reservoir sediments around the production well because processes reducing the flow of gas into the production well also reduce the long-term economic viability of the well. Fine particles, such as clays, exist nearly ubiquitously in the permafrost and marine settings that typically host gas hydrate, and fines reacting to fluid flow by migrating and clogging pore throats can reduce flow toward the production well. Many fines are sensitive to variations in pore-fluid chemistry, swelling in reaction to in situ pore brine being displaced by fresh water liberated from hydrates during dissociation. Additionally, fine particles tend to collect at gas/water interfaces created by the multiphase flow of gas and water. Thus, as methane and fresh water flow from the hydrate-dissociation front toward the production well, fine particles in the reservoir sands, interbedded fine-grained layers and seal layers can be swelled, migrated (or both), potentially clogging pathways and limiting flow to the production well. Objective: This project provides a quantitative basis for reservoir models to account for the impact of clays and other fine-grained material (“fines”) on reservoir compressibility and permeability, two key factors controlling the flow of gas and fluids toward a production well. This overall objective is addressed through a combination of site-specific and more generalized, fundamental science goals: Site-specific measurement goals: quantify the change in compressibility and permeability due to the reaction of fines to pore-water freshening in sediment collected during gas hydrates research expeditions (2010 UBGH2 expedition offshore eastern Korea; 2015 NGHP-02 expedition offshore eastern India). Fundamental measurements on pure fines goal: distinguish between, and quantify, mechanisms for sediment compressibility and permeability change due to physical and chemical responses of fines to the flow of freshened pore water and gas:  Chemical response: quantify and catalog the sensitivity of pure fines (fines with only a single component, or “endmember” fines) to pore-water chemistry.  Physical response: quantify the link between fines migration and clogging during single and multiphase flow.},
doi = {10.2172/1558747},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}