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Title: Lifetime Model Development for Supercritical CO2 CSP Systems

Abstract

A project to develop an industry-supported lifetime model for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO 2) as a working fluid in a >50% efficiency power block was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brayton Energy, LLC. Four commercial alloys, Haynes 282, Inconel 740H, alloy 625 and Febase Sanicro 25, were selected for evaluation based on industry feedback including three partner alloy manufacturers. The compatibility evaluations focused on two conditions: 300 bar industrial grade (IG) sCO 2 using 500-h cycles and 1 bar sCO 2 using 10-h cycles to simulate the solar duty cycle. The last two years of the project focused on completing long-term exposures (10-15 kh) at 750°C. In addition, companion experiments were conducted in 1 bar IG CO 2 using 500-h cycles and in non-CO 2 environments (air and O 2) to better understand the effects of pressure and CO 2. To understand the effect of sCO 2 on mechanical properties, creep and creep-fatigue rupture testing in sCO 2 and pressurized air was conducted on alloy tubes at 750°C. In creep, no sCO 2 debit was noted for the four alloys. In creep-fatigue, alloy 740H specimens showed a >2X debit in lifetime inmore » sCO 2 compared to pressurized air with an 8 min cycle.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1515655
Report Number(s):
ORNL/SPR-2019/1134
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; EE0001556
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Pint, Bruce A., and Pillai, Rishi R. Lifetime Model Development for Supercritical CO2 CSP Systems. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1515655.
Pint, Bruce A., & Pillai, Rishi R. Lifetime Model Development for Supercritical CO2 CSP Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1515655.
Pint, Bruce A., and Pillai, Rishi R. Wed . "Lifetime Model Development for Supercritical CO2 CSP Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1515655. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1515655.
@article{osti_1515655,
title = {Lifetime Model Development for Supercritical CO2 CSP Systems},
author = {Pint, Bruce A. and Pillai, Rishi R.},
abstractNote = {A project to develop an industry-supported lifetime model for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as a working fluid in a >50% efficiency power block was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brayton Energy, LLC. Four commercial alloys, Haynes 282, Inconel 740H, alloy 625 and Febase Sanicro 25, were selected for evaluation based on industry feedback including three partner alloy manufacturers. The compatibility evaluations focused on two conditions: 300 bar industrial grade (IG) sCO2 using 500-h cycles and 1 bar sCO2 using 10-h cycles to simulate the solar duty cycle. The last two years of the project focused on completing long-term exposures (10-15 kh) at 750°C. In addition, companion experiments were conducted in 1 bar IG CO2 using 500-h cycles and in non-CO2 environments (air and O2) to better understand the effects of pressure and CO2. To understand the effect of sCO2 on mechanical properties, creep and creep-fatigue rupture testing in sCO2 and pressurized air was conducted on alloy tubes at 750°C. In creep, no sCO2 debit was noted for the four alloys. In creep-fatigue, alloy 740H specimens showed a >2X debit in lifetime in sCO2 compared to pressurized air with an 8 min cycle.},
doi = {10.2172/1515655},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

Technical Report:

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