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Title: Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health

Abstract

The chemical behavior of radionuclides can vary widely in soil and sediment environments. Equally important, for a given radionuclide the physico-chemical properties of the solids and aqueous phase can greatly influence a radionuclides behavior. Radionuclides can conceivably occur in soils as soluble-free, inorganic-soluble-complexed, organic-soluble, complexed, adsorbed, precipitated, coprecipitated, or solid structural species. While it is clear that an assessment of a radionuclide?s soil chemistry and potential shifts in speciation will yield a considerable understanding of its behavior in the natural environment, it does not directly translate to bioavailability or its impact on ecosystems health. The soil chemical factors have to be linked to food chain considerations and other ecological parameters that directly tie to an analysis of ecosystem health. In general, the movement of radionuclides from lower to higher trophic levels diminishes with each trophic level in both aqua tic and terrestrial systems. In some cases, transfer is limited because of low absorption/assimilation by successive trophic organisms (Pu, U); for other radionuclides (Tc, H) assimilation may be high but rapid metabolic turnover and low retention greatly reduce tissue concentrations available to predator species. Still others are chemical analogs of essential elements whose concentrations are maintained under strict metabolic control inmore » tissues (Cs) or are stored in tissues seldom consumed by other organisms (Sr storage in exoskeleton, shells, and bone). Therefore, the organisms that receive the greatest ingestion exposures are those in lower trophic positions or are in higher trophic levels but within simple, short food chains. Food source, behavior, and habitat influence the accumulation of radionuclides in animals.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15005504
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-31850
TRN: US200322%%246
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: Soil Chemistry and Ecosystem Health, 52(85-132); Soil Science Society of America, Madison,Madison; PBD: 1 Dec 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANIMALS; ECOSYSTEMS; EXOSKELETON; FOOD; FOOD CHAINS; HABITAT; INGESTION; RADIOISOTOPES; RETENTION; SEDIMENTS; SOIL CHEMISTRY; SOILS; STORAGE; TRANSFORMATIONS

Citation Formats

Fellows, Robert J., Ainsworth, Calvin C., Driver, Crystal J., and Cataldo, Dominic A. Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Fellows, Robert J., Ainsworth, Calvin C., Driver, Crystal J., & Cataldo, Dominic A. Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health. United States.
Fellows, Robert J., Ainsworth, Calvin C., Driver, Crystal J., and Cataldo, Dominic A. 1998. "Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_15005504,
title = {Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health},
author = {Fellows, Robert J. and Ainsworth, Calvin C. and Driver, Crystal J. and Cataldo, Dominic A.},
abstractNote = {The chemical behavior of radionuclides can vary widely in soil and sediment environments. Equally important, for a given radionuclide the physico-chemical properties of the solids and aqueous phase can greatly influence a radionuclides behavior. Radionuclides can conceivably occur in soils as soluble-free, inorganic-soluble-complexed, organic-soluble, complexed, adsorbed, precipitated, coprecipitated, or solid structural species. While it is clear that an assessment of a radionuclide?s soil chemistry and potential shifts in speciation will yield a considerable understanding of its behavior in the natural environment, it does not directly translate to bioavailability or its impact on ecosystems health. The soil chemical factors have to be linked to food chain considerations and other ecological parameters that directly tie to an analysis of ecosystem health. In general, the movement of radionuclides from lower to higher trophic levels diminishes with each trophic level in both aqua tic and terrestrial systems. In some cases, transfer is limited because of low absorption/assimilation by successive trophic organisms (Pu, U); for other radionuclides (Tc, H) assimilation may be high but rapid metabolic turnover and low retention greatly reduce tissue concentrations available to predator species. Still others are chemical analogs of essential elements whose concentrations are maintained under strict metabolic control in tissues (Cs) or are stored in tissues seldom consumed by other organisms (Sr storage in exoskeleton, shells, and bone). Therefore, the organisms that receive the greatest ingestion exposures are those in lower trophic positions or are in higher trophic levels but within simple, short food chains. Food source, behavior, and habitat influence the accumulation of radionuclides in animals.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

Conference:
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