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Title: Review of hydro-instability experiments with alternate capsule supports in indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

Abstract

Hydrodynamic instability growth of capsule support membranes (or “tents”) has been recognized as one of the major contributors to the performance degradation in high-compression plastic capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The capsules were supported by tents because the nominal 10-μm diameter fill tubes were not strong enough to support capsules by themselves in indirect-drive implosions on NIF. After it was recognized that the tents had a significant impact of implosion's stability, new alternative support methods were investigated. While some of these methods completely eliminated tent, other concepts still used tents, but concentrated on mitigating their impact. The tent-less methods included “fishing pole” reinforced fill tubes, cantilevered fill tubes, and thin-wire “tetra cage” supports. In the “fishing pole” concept, a 10-μm fill tube was inserted inside 30-μm fill tube for extra support with the connection point located 300 μm away from the capsule surface. The cantilevered fill tubes were supported by 12-μm thick SiC rods, offset by up to 300 μm from the capsule surfaces. In the “tetra-cage” concept, 2.5-μm thick wires (carbon nanotube yarns) were used to support a capsule. Other concepts used “polar tents” and a “foam-shell” to mitigate the effects of the tents. The “polarmore » tents” had significantly reduced contact area between the tents and the capsule compared to the nominal tents. In the “foam-shell” concept, a 200-μm thick, 30 mg/cc SiO 2 foam layer was used to offset the tents away from the capsule surface in an attempt to mitigate their effects. These concepts were investigated in x-ray radiography experiments and compared with perturbations from standard tent support. The measured perturbations in the “fishing pole,” cantilevered fill tube, and “tetra-cage” concepts compared favorably with (were smaller than) nominal tent perturbations and were recommended for further testing for feasibility in layered DT implosions. The “polar tents” were tested in layered DT implosions with a relatively-stable “high-foot” drive showing an improvement in neutron yield in one experiment compared to companion implosions with nominal tents. Furthermore, this article reviews and summarizes recent experiments on these alternate capsule support concepts. In addition, the concept of magnetic levitation is also discussed.« less

Authors:
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  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)
  3. Schafer Corp., Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1479069
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-750300
Journal ID: ISSN 1070-664X; 935594
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physics of Plasmas
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1070-664X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Smalyuk, V. A., Robey, H. F., Alday, C. L., Amendt, P., Aracne-Ruddle, C., Bigelow, J. R., Bunn, T., Casey, D. T., Chen, K. -C., Clark, D. S., Cortez, J. P., Crippen, J., Diaz, S., Farrell, M., Felker, S., Field, J. E., Jaquez, J., Johnson, S., Haan, S. W., Hammel, B. A., Hamza, A. V., Havre, M. O., Heinbockel, C., Hsing, W. W., Kangas, K., Kroll, J. J., Kucheyev, S. O., Landen, O. L., Lepro-Chavez, X., MacPhee, A. G., Martinez, D. A., Milovich, J., Nikroo, A., Pickworth, L. A., Rice, N., Stadermann, M., Steich, D., and Weber, C. R.. Review of hydro-instability experiments with alternate capsule supports in indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5042081.
Smalyuk, V. A., Robey, H. F., Alday, C. L., Amendt, P., Aracne-Ruddle, C., Bigelow, J. R., Bunn, T., Casey, D. T., Chen, K. -C., Clark, D. S., Cortez, J. P., Crippen, J., Diaz, S., Farrell, M., Felker, S., Field, J. E., Jaquez, J., Johnson, S., Haan, S. W., Hammel, B. A., Hamza, A. V., Havre, M. O., Heinbockel, C., Hsing, W. W., Kangas, K., Kroll, J. J., Kucheyev, S. O., Landen, O. L., Lepro-Chavez, X., MacPhee, A. G., Martinez, D. A., Milovich, J., Nikroo, A., Pickworth, L. A., Rice, N., Stadermann, M., Steich, D., & Weber, C. R.. Review of hydro-instability experiments with alternate capsule supports in indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5042081.
Smalyuk, V. A., Robey, H. F., Alday, C. L., Amendt, P., Aracne-Ruddle, C., Bigelow, J. R., Bunn, T., Casey, D. T., Chen, K. -C., Clark, D. S., Cortez, J. P., Crippen, J., Diaz, S., Farrell, M., Felker, S., Field, J. E., Jaquez, J., Johnson, S., Haan, S. W., Hammel, B. A., Hamza, A. V., Havre, M. O., Heinbockel, C., Hsing, W. W., Kangas, K., Kroll, J. J., Kucheyev, S. O., Landen, O. L., Lepro-Chavez, X., MacPhee, A. G., Martinez, D. A., Milovich, J., Nikroo, A., Pickworth, L. A., Rice, N., Stadermann, M., Steich, D., and Weber, C. R.. Mon . "Review of hydro-instability experiments with alternate capsule supports in indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5042081.
@article{osti_1479069,
title = {Review of hydro-instability experiments with alternate capsule supports in indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility},
author = {Smalyuk, V. A. and Robey, H. F. and Alday, C. L. and Amendt, P. and Aracne-Ruddle, C. and Bigelow, J. R. and Bunn, T. and Casey, D. T. and Chen, K. -C. and Clark, D. S. and Cortez, J. P. and Crippen, J. and Diaz, S. and Farrell, M. and Felker, S. and Field, J. E. and Jaquez, J. and Johnson, S. and Haan, S. W. and Hammel, B. A. and Hamza, A. V. and Havre, M. O. and Heinbockel, C. and Hsing, W. W. and Kangas, K. and Kroll, J. J. and Kucheyev, S. O. and Landen, O. L. and Lepro-Chavez, X. and MacPhee, A. G. and Martinez, D. A. and Milovich, J. and Nikroo, A. and Pickworth, L. A. and Rice, N. and Stadermann, M. and Steich, D. and Weber, C. R.},
abstractNote = {Hydrodynamic instability growth of capsule support membranes (or “tents”) has been recognized as one of the major contributors to the performance degradation in high-compression plastic capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The capsules were supported by tents because the nominal 10-μm diameter fill tubes were not strong enough to support capsules by themselves in indirect-drive implosions on NIF. After it was recognized that the tents had a significant impact of implosion's stability, new alternative support methods were investigated. While some of these methods completely eliminated tent, other concepts still used tents, but concentrated on mitigating their impact. The tent-less methods included “fishing pole” reinforced fill tubes, cantilevered fill tubes, and thin-wire “tetra cage” supports. In the “fishing pole” concept, a 10-μm fill tube was inserted inside 30-μm fill tube for extra support with the connection point located 300 μm away from the capsule surface. The cantilevered fill tubes were supported by 12-μm thick SiC rods, offset by up to 300 μm from the capsule surfaces. In the “tetra-cage” concept, 2.5-μm thick wires (carbon nanotube yarns) were used to support a capsule. Other concepts used “polar tents” and a “foam-shell” to mitigate the effects of the tents. The “polar tents” had significantly reduced contact area between the tents and the capsule compared to the nominal tents. In the “foam-shell” concept, a 200-μm thick, 30 mg/cc SiO2 foam layer was used to offset the tents away from the capsule surface in an attempt to mitigate their effects. These concepts were investigated in x-ray radiography experiments and compared with perturbations from standard tent support. The measured perturbations in the “fishing pole,” cantilevered fill tube, and “tetra-cage” concepts compared favorably with (were smaller than) nominal tent perturbations and were recommended for further testing for feasibility in layered DT implosions. The “polar tents” were tested in layered DT implosions with a relatively-stable “high-foot” drive showing an improvement in neutron yield in one experiment compared to companion implosions with nominal tents. Furthermore, this article reviews and summarizes recent experiments on these alternate capsule support concepts. In addition, the concept of magnetic levitation is also discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5042081},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
issn = {1070-664X},
number = 7,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Laser Compression of Matter to Super-High Densities: Thermonuclear (CTR) Applications
journal, September 1972

  • Nuckolls, John; Wood, Lowell; Thiessen, Albert
  • Nature, Vol. 239, Issue 5368, p. 139-142
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