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Title: Predicting Nanoparticle Suspension Viscoelasticity for Multimaterial 3D Printing of Silica–Titania Glass

Abstract

A lack of predictive methodology is frequently a major bottleneck in materials development for additive manufacturing. Hence, exploration of new printable materials often relies on the serendipity of trial and error approaches, which is time-consuming, labor-intensive, and costly. In this paper, we present an approach to overcome these issues by quantifying and controlling the viscoelasticity of inks for multimaterial 3D printing of silica–titania glass using direct ink writing (DIW). We formulate simple silica and silica–titania inks from a suspension of fumed silica nanoparticles in an organic solvent with a dissolved molecular titania precursor. We use a small set of experimental rheological data and estimates of interaction potentials from colloidal theory to develop a predictive tool that allows us to design and obtain compatible inks that are matched both in desired rheological properties (viscosity profiles and elastic modulus) as well as solids loading. The model incorporates silica particle volume fraction, particle size, particle size distribution, and titania precursor concentration, and captures the effects of all formulation parameters on the measured viscoelasticity in a single curve. We validate the ink formulations predicted by the model and find that the materials can be very well matched in rheological properties as desired for 3Dmore » printing. Using the DIW and heat treatment methods we have reported previously, we use these inks to print and process a fully transparent glass with spatial change in dopant composition and refractive index. Finally, we believe that this approach can be extended to other colloidal systems and allow predictive ink formulation design for desired printability in direct ink write manufacturing.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; LLNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1476223
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-749401
Journal ID: ISSN 2574-0970; 934089
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Applied Nano Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2574-0970
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 3D printing; colloids; direct ink writing; glass; multimaterial; rheology

Citation Formats

Dudukovic, Nikola A., Wong, Lana L., Nguyen, Du T., Destino, Joel F., Yee, Timothy D., Ryerson, Frederick J., Suratwala, Tayyab, Duoss, Eric B., and Dylla-Spears, Rebecca. Predicting Nanoparticle Suspension Viscoelasticity for Multimaterial 3D Printing of Silica–Titania Glass. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acsanm.8b00821.
Dudukovic, Nikola A., Wong, Lana L., Nguyen, Du T., Destino, Joel F., Yee, Timothy D., Ryerson, Frederick J., Suratwala, Tayyab, Duoss, Eric B., & Dylla-Spears, Rebecca. Predicting Nanoparticle Suspension Viscoelasticity for Multimaterial 3D Printing of Silica–Titania Glass. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsanm.8b00821
Dudukovic, Nikola A., Wong, Lana L., Nguyen, Du T., Destino, Joel F., Yee, Timothy D., Ryerson, Frederick J., Suratwala, Tayyab, Duoss, Eric B., and Dylla-Spears, Rebecca. Tue . "Predicting Nanoparticle Suspension Viscoelasticity for Multimaterial 3D Printing of Silica–Titania Glass". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsanm.8b00821. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1476223.
@article{osti_1476223,
title = {Predicting Nanoparticle Suspension Viscoelasticity for Multimaterial 3D Printing of Silica–Titania Glass},
author = {Dudukovic, Nikola A. and Wong, Lana L. and Nguyen, Du T. and Destino, Joel F. and Yee, Timothy D. and Ryerson, Frederick J. and Suratwala, Tayyab and Duoss, Eric B. and Dylla-Spears, Rebecca},
abstractNote = {A lack of predictive methodology is frequently a major bottleneck in materials development for additive manufacturing. Hence, exploration of new printable materials often relies on the serendipity of trial and error approaches, which is time-consuming, labor-intensive, and costly. In this paper, we present an approach to overcome these issues by quantifying and controlling the viscoelasticity of inks for multimaterial 3D printing of silica–titania glass using direct ink writing (DIW). We formulate simple silica and silica–titania inks from a suspension of fumed silica nanoparticles in an organic solvent with a dissolved molecular titania precursor. We use a small set of experimental rheological data and estimates of interaction potentials from colloidal theory to develop a predictive tool that allows us to design and obtain compatible inks that are matched both in desired rheological properties (viscosity profiles and elastic modulus) as well as solids loading. The model incorporates silica particle volume fraction, particle size, particle size distribution, and titania precursor concentration, and captures the effects of all formulation parameters on the measured viscoelasticity in a single curve. We validate the ink formulations predicted by the model and find that the materials can be very well matched in rheological properties as desired for 3D printing. Using the DIW and heat treatment methods we have reported previously, we use these inks to print and process a fully transparent glass with spatial change in dopant composition and refractive index. Finally, we believe that this approach can be extended to other colloidal systems and allow predictive ink formulation design for desired printability in direct ink write manufacturing.},
doi = {10.1021/acsanm.8b00821},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1476223}, journal = {ACS Applied Nano Materials},
issn = {2574-0970},
number = 8,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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Cited by: 9 works
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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Ink formulation requirements. The post-print treatment is sensitive to chemical modification of the ink, which can result in unwanted subsequent porosity (i.e. lack of transparency) or decreased green body strength (i.e. cracking).

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Works referencing / citing this record:

3D Printing of Compositional Gradients Using the Microfluidic Circuit Analogy
journal, November 2019


Water-glass based silica aerogel: unique nanostructured filler for epoxy nanocomposites
journal, June 2019


3D printing with 2D colloids: designing rheology protocols to predict ‘printability’ of soft-materials
journal, January 2019


    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.