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Title: Final Scientific / Technical Report: Enabling Technologies for Heavy-Duty Vehicles – Cummins 55BTE

Abstract

The Cummins 55% BTE (55BTE) program has completed the planned technical work on the project. This work includes the planned engine system demonstration in pursuit of the goal of demonstrating a peak system brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of 55%. The engine system included a high efficiency diesel engine integrated with a state-of-the-art waste heat recovery (WHR) system and an advanced aftertreatment system capable of meeting the current emissions standards. While the ultimate program goal of 55% BTE was not fully achieved due to hardware issues during the final testing phase, the program demonstrated a significant increase in reported engine system BTE for a heavy duty sized engine. The previous demonstrations in the Department of Energy funded SuperTruck 1 programs ranged between 50% - 51% BTE. The Cummins 55% BTE program demonstrated 54% BTE. Additionally, the program established a revised path-to-target showing how the system could be improved to reach the ultimate program goal of 55% BTE with some minor modification to the engine system. The changes in the revised path-to-target were unable to be completed during the course of this program due to time and money constraints placed on the program. The program’s goals were challenging in both scope andmore » timing. Although the program’s goal can be simply stated in terms of demonstrating a system efficiency of 55%, the achievement of a heavy-duty diesel engine capable of full torque curve operation, adequate transient performance, low emissions and high brake thermal efficiency (>51% BTE) had not been previously demonstrated in a heavy-duty engine. The closest efforts to date included the SuperTruck 1 programs referenced earlier. The program made several advancements in all system areas. The combustion system was re-designed for a shorter combustion duration and lower in-cylinder heat loss. This was achieved through optimization of the fuel injection rate shape, number of spray holes, piston bowl shape, compression ratio, piston oil cooling, heat flow through the piston and in-cylinder charge motion. The air handling system was re-designed to provide cooled EGR at virtually no pumping penalty. This was achieved through implementation of a dual loop EGR system, reduction of EGR system pressure drop, and implementation of advanced turbocharger efficiency technologies. The engine friction and parasitic signature was dramatically reduced by the program through adoption of variable flow pumps, advanced rings and coatings, rollerized valvetrain, adoption of low viscosity lubricants and reduction in cylinder line bore distortion. The aftertreatment system was optimized through use of low dP substrates and an ammonia gas injection system. The WHR system development included the use of a dual-entry turbine and a mixed charger cooler. Finding and implementing these solutions in a short two-year program at the budgeted funding provided the greatest challenge for the program.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cummins Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V); USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
OSTI Identifier:
1474075
Report Number(s):
DOE-CUMMINS-0007281-1
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0007281
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; diesel; high efficiency; waste heat recovery; WHR; ORC; advanced combustion

Citation Formats

Kocher, Lyle. Final Scientific / Technical Report: Enabling Technologies for Heavy-Duty Vehicles – Cummins 55BTE. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1474075.
Kocher, Lyle. Final Scientific / Technical Report: Enabling Technologies for Heavy-Duty Vehicles – Cummins 55BTE. United States. doi:10.2172/1474075.
Kocher, Lyle. Thu . "Final Scientific / Technical Report: Enabling Technologies for Heavy-Duty Vehicles – Cummins 55BTE". United States. doi:10.2172/1474075. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1474075.
@article{osti_1474075,
title = {Final Scientific / Technical Report: Enabling Technologies for Heavy-Duty Vehicles – Cummins 55BTE},
author = {Kocher, Lyle},
abstractNote = {The Cummins 55% BTE (55BTE) program has completed the planned technical work on the project. This work includes the planned engine system demonstration in pursuit of the goal of demonstrating a peak system brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of 55%. The engine system included a high efficiency diesel engine integrated with a state-of-the-art waste heat recovery (WHR) system and an advanced aftertreatment system capable of meeting the current emissions standards. While the ultimate program goal of 55% BTE was not fully achieved due to hardware issues during the final testing phase, the program demonstrated a significant increase in reported engine system BTE for a heavy duty sized engine. The previous demonstrations in the Department of Energy funded SuperTruck 1 programs ranged between 50% - 51% BTE. The Cummins 55% BTE program demonstrated 54% BTE. Additionally, the program established a revised path-to-target showing how the system could be improved to reach the ultimate program goal of 55% BTE with some minor modification to the engine system. The changes in the revised path-to-target were unable to be completed during the course of this program due to time and money constraints placed on the program. The program’s goals were challenging in both scope and timing. Although the program’s goal can be simply stated in terms of demonstrating a system efficiency of 55%, the achievement of a heavy-duty diesel engine capable of full torque curve operation, adequate transient performance, low emissions and high brake thermal efficiency (>51% BTE) had not been previously demonstrated in a heavy-duty engine. The closest efforts to date included the SuperTruck 1 programs referenced earlier. The program made several advancements in all system areas. The combustion system was re-designed for a shorter combustion duration and lower in-cylinder heat loss. This was achieved through optimization of the fuel injection rate shape, number of spray holes, piston bowl shape, compression ratio, piston oil cooling, heat flow through the piston and in-cylinder charge motion. The air handling system was re-designed to provide cooled EGR at virtually no pumping penalty. This was achieved through implementation of a dual loop EGR system, reduction of EGR system pressure drop, and implementation of advanced turbocharger efficiency technologies. The engine friction and parasitic signature was dramatically reduced by the program through adoption of variable flow pumps, advanced rings and coatings, rollerized valvetrain, adoption of low viscosity lubricants and reduction in cylinder line bore distortion. The aftertreatment system was optimized through use of low dP substrates and an ammonia gas injection system. The WHR system development included the use of a dual-entry turbine and a mixed charger cooler. Finding and implementing these solutions in a short two-year program at the budgeted funding provided the greatest challenge for the program.},
doi = {10.2172/1474075},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}