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Title: Conformable Hydrogen Storage Pressure Vessel

Abstract

Existing commercially available hydrogen storage technologies are largely based on bulky and costly pressure vessels. These pressure vessels come in various forms, ranging from Type I steel cylinders to Type III and Type IV composite wrapped cylinders with metallic or polymer liners. In efforts to increase the pressure vessel storage density and meet DOE hydrogen storage targets, manufacturers are making incremental improvements. This approach alone is unlikely to meet DOE hydrogen storage targets and increase adoption of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The project team, led by the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) and consisting of High Energy Coil Reservoirs, LLC (HECR) and The University of Texas at Austin's Center for Electromechanics (UT-CEM), has investigated a transformational hydrogen storage technology using high pressure modulus polymeric pressure vessels. These vessels are constructed by overwrapping an extruded thermoplastic elastomeric resin liner with high performance tensile fiber. This technology is used in commercially available compressed air storage for firefighters. The result is a lightweight, flexible, non-explosive, and non-fragmenting pressure vessel that can be shaped (prior to pressurization) to conform to specific applications. Although this project was funded to investigate the potential for this technology for vehicle applications, a potential significant cost reductionmore » allowed with this approach may make it effective for high pressure ground storage as well. As part of Phase I of this project, the research team demonstrated a Kevlar™ over-braid that achieves a burst pressure in excess of 3.1X the operating pressure of 700 bar. The conformable vessel is able to achieve this pressure rating with reduced weight and cost when compared to Type IV vessels. The researchers also identified two potential resins to serve as the liner of the vessel. These resins have excellent hydrogen barrier properties that could enable a liner thickness of 0.06 inches or less; however, difficulties in manufacturing the core due to the extrusion manufacturing processes required testing with prototype resins as commercially available resins were not found that had the required properties. The team was able to build and test a vessel with one such blend, which outperformed the baseline Hytrel resin materials but did not meet the project hydrogen permeability rate goals.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Center for Transportation and the Environment, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Electromechanics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Center for Transportation and the Environment, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fuel Cell Technologies Office (EE-3F)
OSTI Identifier:
1459184
Report Number(s):
DOE-CTE-06967
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0006967
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; Hydrogen; Storage; Pressure Vessel

Citation Formats

Bigelow, Erik, and Lewis, Michael. Conformable Hydrogen Storage Pressure Vessel. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1459184.
Bigelow, Erik, & Lewis, Michael. Conformable Hydrogen Storage Pressure Vessel. United States. doi:10.2172/1459184.
Bigelow, Erik, and Lewis, Michael. Fri . "Conformable Hydrogen Storage Pressure Vessel". United States. doi:10.2172/1459184. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1459184.
@article{osti_1459184,
title = {Conformable Hydrogen Storage Pressure Vessel},
author = {Bigelow, Erik and Lewis, Michael},
abstractNote = {Existing commercially available hydrogen storage technologies are largely based on bulky and costly pressure vessels. These pressure vessels come in various forms, ranging from Type I steel cylinders to Type III and Type IV composite wrapped cylinders with metallic or polymer liners. In efforts to increase the pressure vessel storage density and meet DOE hydrogen storage targets, manufacturers are making incremental improvements. This approach alone is unlikely to meet DOE hydrogen storage targets and increase adoption of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The project team, led by the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) and consisting of High Energy Coil Reservoirs, LLC (HECR) and The University of Texas at Austin's Center for Electromechanics (UT-CEM), has investigated a transformational hydrogen storage technology using high pressure modulus polymeric pressure vessels. These vessels are constructed by overwrapping an extruded thermoplastic elastomeric resin liner with high performance tensile fiber. This technology is used in commercially available compressed air storage for firefighters. The result is a lightweight, flexible, non-explosive, and non-fragmenting pressure vessel that can be shaped (prior to pressurization) to conform to specific applications. Although this project was funded to investigate the potential for this technology for vehicle applications, a potential significant cost reduction allowed with this approach may make it effective for high pressure ground storage as well. As part of Phase I of this project, the research team demonstrated a Kevlar™ over-braid that achieves a burst pressure in excess of 3.1X the operating pressure of 700 bar. The conformable vessel is able to achieve this pressure rating with reduced weight and cost when compared to Type IV vessels. The researchers also identified two potential resins to serve as the liner of the vessel. These resins have excellent hydrogen barrier properties that could enable a liner thickness of 0.06 inches or less; however, difficulties in manufacturing the core due to the extrusion manufacturing processes required testing with prototype resins as commercially available resins were not found that had the required properties. The team was able to build and test a vessel with one such blend, which outperformed the baseline Hytrel resin materials but did not meet the project hydrogen permeability rate goals.},
doi = {10.2172/1459184},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}