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Title: Final Conclusions and Lessons Learned from Testing the Integrated Human Event Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Internal Events At-Power Application.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1431690
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-4371C
652776
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2017 International Topical Meeting on Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Analysis (PSA 2017) held September 24-28, 2017 in Pittsburgh, PA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Liao, Huafei, Stephanie Morrow, Gareth Parry, Dennis Bley, Lawrence Criscione, and Mary Presley. Final Conclusions and Lessons Learned from Testing the Integrated Human Event Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Internal Events At-Power Application.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Liao, Huafei, Stephanie Morrow, Gareth Parry, Dennis Bley, Lawrence Criscione, & Mary Presley. Final Conclusions and Lessons Learned from Testing the Integrated Human Event Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Internal Events At-Power Application.. United States.
Liao, Huafei, Stephanie Morrow, Gareth Parry, Dennis Bley, Lawrence Criscione, and Mary Presley. Sat . "Final Conclusions and Lessons Learned from Testing the Integrated Human Event Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Internal Events At-Power Application.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1431690.
@article{osti_1431690,
title = {Final Conclusions and Lessons Learned from Testing the Integrated Human Event Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Internal Events At-Power Application.},
author = {Liao, Huafei and Stephanie Morrow and Gareth Parry and Dennis Bley and Lawrence Criscione and Mary Presley},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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