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Title: Sulvanite (Cu 3VS 4) nanocrystals for printable thin film photovoltaics

Abstract

Copper Vanadium Sulfide (Cu 3VS 4), also known as sulvanite, has recently emerged as a suitable absorber material for thin film photovoltaics. The synthesis of Cu 3VS 4 nanocrystals via a rapid solvothermal route is reported for the first time. The phase purity of the Cu 3VS 4 nanocrystals has been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, while the nanoparticle size, of about 10 nm, was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Successful ligand exchange with sulfide, an inorganic ligand, demonstrated that the nanoparticles are amenable to surface modifications, key element in solution processing. Further annealing of as-synthesized nanocrystals under a sulfur/argon atmosphere at 600 °C, rendered highly crystalline Cu 3VS 4 powders exhibiting an impurity that could be potentially mitigated by annealing temperature optimization. Furthermore, Cu 3VS 4, formed solely from Earth-abundant elements, could provide an inexpensive, reliable approach to fabricating solution processed thin film photovoltaic absorbers.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4]
  1. Delaware State Univ., Dover, DE (United States)
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)
  4. Delaware State Univ., Dover, DE (United States); Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416342
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515; 1435716; 1535876
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Materials Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 211; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0167-577X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Nanocrystalline materials; Nanoparticles; Colloidal processing; Thin films; Solar energy materials; Electronic materials

Citation Formats

Chen, Ching -Chin, Stone, Kevin H., Lai, Cheng -Yu, Dobson, Kevin D., and Radu, Daniela. Sulvanite (Cu3VS4) nanocrystals for printable thin film photovoltaics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2017.09.063.
Chen, Ching -Chin, Stone, Kevin H., Lai, Cheng -Yu, Dobson, Kevin D., & Radu, Daniela. Sulvanite (Cu3VS4) nanocrystals for printable thin film photovoltaics. United States. doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2017.09.063.
Chen, Ching -Chin, Stone, Kevin H., Lai, Cheng -Yu, Dobson, Kevin D., and Radu, Daniela. 2017. "Sulvanite (Cu3VS4) nanocrystals for printable thin film photovoltaics". United States. doi:10.1016/j.matlet.2017.09.063.
@article{osti_1416342,
title = {Sulvanite (Cu3VS4) nanocrystals for printable thin film photovoltaics},
author = {Chen, Ching -Chin and Stone, Kevin H. and Lai, Cheng -Yu and Dobson, Kevin D. and Radu, Daniela},
abstractNote = {Copper Vanadium Sulfide (Cu3VS4), also known as sulvanite, has recently emerged as a suitable absorber material for thin film photovoltaics. The synthesis of Cu3VS4 nanocrystals via a rapid solvothermal route is reported for the first time. The phase purity of the Cu3VS4 nanocrystals has been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, while the nanoparticle size, of about 10 nm, was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Successful ligand exchange with sulfide, an inorganic ligand, demonstrated that the nanoparticles are amenable to surface modifications, key element in solution processing. Further annealing of as-synthesized nanocrystals under a sulfur/argon atmosphere at 600 °C, rendered highly crystalline Cu3VS4 powders exhibiting an impurity that could be potentially mitigated by annealing temperature optimization. Furthermore, Cu3VS4, formed solely from Earth-abundant elements, could provide an inexpensive, reliable approach to fabricating solution processed thin film photovoltaic absorbers.},
doi = {10.1016/j.matlet.2017.09.063},
journal = {Materials Letters},
number = C,
volume = 211,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 21, 2018
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