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Title: Photos of Lansmont PDT 80 drop test machine at Los Alamos

Abstract

The Los Alamos RP-SVS Radiation Protection Services group designed and constructed a drop tower facility for TA- 55 support work. The drop mechanism was supplied by the Lansmont company in Monterey CA. Los Alamos staffers Murray Moore and Yong Tao have noticed that the system is not dropping loads correctly, and they have photographed aspects of the PDT- 80 model system. The first 10 photos show the platen loaded with a cylindrical steel bar. The next 10 photos are of the roller-cam mechanism in the drop tower, and the last 2 photos indicate the amount of looseness in the platen when it is being pulled by a person.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1415364
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-31460
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; container; drop testing

Citation Formats

Moore, Murray E. Photos of Lansmont PDT 80 drop test machine at Los Alamos. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1415364.
Moore, Murray E. Photos of Lansmont PDT 80 drop test machine at Los Alamos. United States. doi:10.2172/1415364.
Moore, Murray E. 2017. "Photos of Lansmont PDT 80 drop test machine at Los Alamos". United States. doi:10.2172/1415364. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1415364.
@article{osti_1415364,
title = {Photos of Lansmont PDT 80 drop test machine at Los Alamos},
author = {Moore, Murray E.},
abstractNote = {The Los Alamos RP-SVS Radiation Protection Services group designed and constructed a drop tower facility for TA- 55 support work. The drop mechanism was supplied by the Lansmont company in Monterey CA. Los Alamos staffers Murray Moore and Yong Tao have noticed that the system is not dropping loads correctly, and they have photographed aspects of the PDT- 80 model system. The first 10 photos show the platen loaded with a cylindrical steel bar. The next 10 photos are of the roller-cam mechanism in the drop tower, and the last 2 photos indicate the amount of looseness in the platen when it is being pulled by a person.},
doi = {10.2172/1415364},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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