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Title: Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)

Abstract

This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
960882
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-08-06344; LA-UR-08-6344
TRN: US201008%%791
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Submittal to David Janecky, LANL ENV-EAQ ; October 10, 2008 ; Los Alamos
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45; AEROSOLS; BUILDINGS; CLEARANCE; DECONTAMINATION; ENGINEERING; EQUIPMENT; FLUIDS; INFORMATION; LANL; PLANNING; PUBLIC HEALTH; RESOURCES; SAMPLING; SIMULATION; VALIDATION; VENTILATION

Citation Formats

Moore, Murray E. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008). United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Moore, Murray E. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008). United States.
Moore, Murray E. 2008. "Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/960882.
@article{osti_960882,
title = {Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)},
author = {Moore, Murray E},
abstractNote = {This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory wasmore » secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.« less
  • The Proposed Action is to reduce the volume of oversized metallic transuranic (TRU) wastes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that would require disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using a decontamination and compaction process. The proposed process, called the decontamination and volume reduction system (DVRS), would be implemented within an existing structure at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) solid radioactive waste storage and disposal area located at Technical Area (TA) 54. The preferred location is Dome 226. Other equivalent locations would be Domes 229, 230, and 231, adjacent to Dome 226, or a pre-engineered structure thatmore » would be placed adjacent to Dome 226. The proposed DVRS would provide the capability to process and dispose of approximately 3,120 yd{sup 3} (2,400 m{sup 3}) of oversized metallic TRU waste currently in storage at TA-54 within a substantially reduced operating period. The majority of this oversized metallic TRU waste, which is currently too big to fit into the approved waste containers used for the WIPP Project, would be sorted, segregated, and decontaminated to meet low-level radioactive waste (LLW) criteria, and then compacted and disposed of on-site as LLW. The remainder of the oversized metallic TRU waste, which cannot be sufficiently decontaminated to meet LLW criteria, would be cut up and compacted to fit into the WIPP-approved waste containers, packaged, and shipped as TRU waste to WIPP. In addition to the existing inventory of oversized metallic TRU waste, the proposed DVRS would also be able to process an additional 3,900 yd{sup 3} (3,000 m{sup 3}) of oversized metallic TRU waste that may result from on-site decontamination and decommissioning activities and equipment replacement at other LANL facilities. The DVRS is expected to process the total estimated 7,020 yd{sup 3} (5,400 m{sup 3}) of oversized metallic TRU waste in about six years. The proposed construction and implementation of the DVRS at LANL would provide DOE with a low-risk, high-benefit opportunity to implement previously used technology (a similar unit has been used at Erwin, Tennessee) to dispose of LANL's oversized metallic TRU waste in an environmentally safe manner. In line with the DOE TRU Waste Management Plan for LANL (LANL 1996), the DVRS would enable DOE to accelerate cleanup objectives while achieving substantial cost savings. Environmental effects under either the Proposed Action or the No Action alternative would be minimal. On average, worker doses would remain well below allowable DOE limits for the Proposed Action. Worker doses could be higher under the No Action alternative but should also remain well below DOE limits. The volume of TRU waste sent to WIPP for disposal would be reduced from 7,020 yd{sup 3} (5,400 m{sup 3}) to 442 yd{sup 3} (340 m{sup 3}) under the Proposed Action.« less
  • The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.
  • Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued onmore » July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.« less
  • The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.