skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The Role of Chromohalobacter on Transport of Lanthanides and Cesium in the Dolomite Mineral System

Abstract

The chemical behavior of actinide series elements and fission products is a concern for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository due to their uncertain mobility in the subsurface salt formation. In this work, we are observing the behavior of the halophilic bacterium, Chromohalobacter, and its effect on the mobility of lanthanides and cesium in the presence of dolomite. Batch and minicolumn experiments were conducted with Cs + and lanthanides (Nd 3+, Eu 3+) to quantify potential transport with bacteria. Preliminary results show that Cs does not interact strongly with dolomite or Chromohalobacter, while the lanthanides can interact strongly with both minerals and bacteria depending on which the Ln contacts first.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1411368
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-30894
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Biological Science; Earth Sciences; Environmental Protection

Citation Formats

Zengotita, Frances, Emerson, Hilary Palmer, Dittrich, Timothy M., Swanson, Juliet S., and Reed, Donald T.. The Role of Chromohalobacter on Transport of Lanthanides and Cesium in the Dolomite Mineral System. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1411368.
Zengotita, Frances, Emerson, Hilary Palmer, Dittrich, Timothy M., Swanson, Juliet S., & Reed, Donald T.. The Role of Chromohalobacter on Transport of Lanthanides and Cesium in the Dolomite Mineral System. United States. doi:10.2172/1411368.
Zengotita, Frances, Emerson, Hilary Palmer, Dittrich, Timothy M., Swanson, Juliet S., and Reed, Donald T.. Fri . "The Role of Chromohalobacter on Transport of Lanthanides and Cesium in the Dolomite Mineral System". United States. doi:10.2172/1411368. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1411368.
@article{osti_1411368,
title = {The Role of Chromohalobacter on Transport of Lanthanides and Cesium in the Dolomite Mineral System},
author = {Zengotita, Frances and Emerson, Hilary Palmer and Dittrich, Timothy M. and Swanson, Juliet S. and Reed, Donald T.},
abstractNote = {The chemical behavior of actinide series elements and fission products is a concern for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository due to their uncertain mobility in the subsurface salt formation. In this work, we are observing the behavior of the halophilic bacterium, Chromohalobacter, and its effect on the mobility of lanthanides and cesium in the presence of dolomite. Batch and minicolumn experiments were conducted with Cs+ and lanthanides (Nd3+, Eu3+) to quantify potential transport with bacteria. Preliminary results show that Cs does not interact strongly with dolomite or Chromohalobacter, while the lanthanides can interact strongly with both minerals and bacteria depending on which the Ln contacts first.},
doi = {10.2172/1411368},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Our research was guided by a key objective of the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP), which is to improve conceptual and predictive models for contaminant movement in complex vadose zone environments. In this report, increases in the understanding of colloidcontaminant interactions, colloid mobilization, and colloid deposition within unsaturated soils are cited as requisite needs for predicting contaminant fate and distribution in the vadose zone. We addressed these needs by pursuing three key goals: 1. Identify the mechanisms that govern OM and mineral-colloid reaction and transport in heterogeneous, unsaturated porous media; 2. Quantify the role of OM and mineral colloids inmore » scavenging and facilitating the transport of contaminants of concern to DOE; and 3. Develop and test a mathematical model suitable for simulating the movement of OM- and colloid-associated contaminants through heterogeneous, unsaturated porous media.« less
  • A column-flow cesium migration experiment has been conducted in support of the safety assessment program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southeastern New Mexico. The column was a monolithic cylinder of Magenta dolomite obtained from a core sample drilled near the proposed WIPP site. The fluid was a Magenta equilibrated de-ionized water solution that had been doped with 0.001 ppM of /sup 137/Cs. The experiment ran continuously for an 18 month period at flow rates comparable to those measured for natural groundwater at the site. After flowing for 18 months, the apparatus was disassembled and the dolomite columnmore » examined for cesium distribution. Cross sectional radiographs of the sample showed that most of the cesium had penetrated only 0.4 cm into the solid Magenta column with a well defined wave front. On the other hand, trace quantities (2 x 10/sup -7/ ppM) of /sup 137/Cs were detected in effluent samples collected during the experiment. The distribution coefficient (120 ml/gm) calculated (assuming porous flow) from the average depth of cesium penetration (0.3 cm) is considerably less than the value obtained from a batch equilibration measurement made on the same system (650 ml/gm), indicating that cesium will migrate through Magenta rock at a faster rate than batch equilibration value predicts. Transmission electron microscope analysis of a piece of Magenta dolomite from the same core that had been soaked in 1 molar CsCl solution indicated that the cesium was preferentially sorbed on a montmorillonite clay phase that was inhomogeneously dispersed throughout the sample. These results indicate that if groundwater travels through Magenta rock the dissolved cesium may be retarded by the clay content of the rock.« less
  • Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggestmore » the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or hot-spot,'' areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).« less
  • Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggestmore » the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or ``hot-spot,`` areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).« less