skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Nonlinear terahertz devices utilizing semiconducting plasmonic metamaterials

Abstract

The development of responsive metamaterials has enabled the realization of compact tunable photonic devices capable of manipulating the amplitude, polarization, wave vector and frequency of light. Integration of semiconductors into the active regions of metallic resonators is a proven approach for creating nonlinear metamaterials through optoelectronic control of the semiconductor carrier density. Metal-free subwavelength resonant semiconductor structures offer an alternative approach to create dynamic metamaterials. We present InAs plasmonic disk arrays as a viable resonant metamaterial at terahertz frequencies. Importantly, InAs plasmonic disks exhibit a strong nonlinear response arising from electric field-induced intervalley scattering, resulting in a reduced carrier mobility thereby damping the plasmonic response. here, we demonstrate nonlinear perfect absorbers configured as either optical limiters or saturable absorbers, including flexible nonlinear absorbers achieved by transferring the disks to polyimide films. Nonlinear plasmonic metamaterials show potential for use in ultrafast terahertz (THz) optics and for passive protection of sensitive electromagnetic devices.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [2]
  1. Boston Univ., MA (United States). Lab. for Microsystems Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  2. Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  3. Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). School of Engineering
  4. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Microelectronics Research Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Boston Univ., MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF); US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
OSTI Identifier:
1393404
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-09ER46643; SC0002384
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Light, Science & Applications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2047-7538
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; nonlinear absorbers; nonlinear metamaterials; plasmonic semiconductor metamaterials; terahertz metamaterials; transfer printing

Citation Formats

Seren, Huseyin R., Zhang, Jingdi, Keiser, George R., Maddox, Scott J., Zhao, Xiaoguang, Fan, Kebin, Bank, Seth R., Zhang, Xin, and Averitt, Richard D. Nonlinear terahertz devices utilizing semiconducting plasmonic metamaterials. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/lsa.2016.78.
Seren, Huseyin R., Zhang, Jingdi, Keiser, George R., Maddox, Scott J., Zhao, Xiaoguang, Fan, Kebin, Bank, Seth R., Zhang, Xin, & Averitt, Richard D. Nonlinear terahertz devices utilizing semiconducting plasmonic metamaterials. United States. doi:10.1038/lsa.2016.78.
Seren, Huseyin R., Zhang, Jingdi, Keiser, George R., Maddox, Scott J., Zhao, Xiaoguang, Fan, Kebin, Bank, Seth R., Zhang, Xin, and Averitt, Richard D. Tue . "Nonlinear terahertz devices utilizing semiconducting plasmonic metamaterials". United States. doi:10.1038/lsa.2016.78. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393404.
@article{osti_1393404,
title = {Nonlinear terahertz devices utilizing semiconducting plasmonic metamaterials},
author = {Seren, Huseyin R. and Zhang, Jingdi and Keiser, George R. and Maddox, Scott J. and Zhao, Xiaoguang and Fan, Kebin and Bank, Seth R. and Zhang, Xin and Averitt, Richard D.},
abstractNote = {The development of responsive metamaterials has enabled the realization of compact tunable photonic devices capable of manipulating the amplitude, polarization, wave vector and frequency of light. Integration of semiconductors into the active regions of metallic resonators is a proven approach for creating nonlinear metamaterials through optoelectronic control of the semiconductor carrier density. Metal-free subwavelength resonant semiconductor structures offer an alternative approach to create dynamic metamaterials. We present InAs plasmonic disk arrays as a viable resonant metamaterial at terahertz frequencies. Importantly, InAs plasmonic disks exhibit a strong nonlinear response arising from electric field-induced intervalley scattering, resulting in a reduced carrier mobility thereby damping the plasmonic response. here, we demonstrate nonlinear perfect absorbers configured as either optical limiters or saturable absorbers, including flexible nonlinear absorbers achieved by transferring the disks to polyimide films. Nonlinear plasmonic metamaterials show potential for use in ultrafast terahertz (THz) optics and for passive protection of sensitive electromagnetic devices.},
doi = {10.1038/lsa.2016.78},
journal = {Light, Science & Applications},
number = 5,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Tue Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • We theoretically propose and numerically investigate an active plasmonic device made up of a nonlinear {epsilon}-near-zero metamaterial slab of thickness smaller than 100 nm lying on a linear {epsilon}-near-zero metamaterial substrate. We predict that in free-space coupling configuration the system operating at low intensity displays plasmon mediated hysteresis behavior. The phase difference between the reflected and the incident optical waves turns out to be multivalued and dependent on the history of the excitation process. Such an hysteresis behavior allows the proposed system to be regarded as a memory device whose state is accessible by measuring either the mentioned phase differencemore » or the power, which is multivalued as well, carried by the nonlinear plasmon wave. Since multiple plasmon powers comprise both positive and negative values, the device also operates as a switch of the plasmon power direction at each jump along an hysteresis loop.« less
  • All-optical tunable plasmonic-mode coupling is realized in a nonlinear photonic metamaterial consisting of periodic arrays of gold asymmetrically split ring resonators, covered with a poly[(methyl methacrylate)-co-(disperse red 13 acrylate)] azobenzene polymer layer. The third-order optical nonlinearity of the azobenzene polymer is enormously enhanced by using resonant excitation. Under excitation with a 17-kW/cm{sup 2}, 532-nm pump light, plasmonic modes shift by 51 nm and the mode interval is enlarged by 30 nm. Compared with previous reports, the threshold pump intensity is reduced by five orders of magnitude, while extremely large tunability is maintained.
  • We present experimental and numerical investigations of planar terahertz metamaterial structures designed to interact with the state of polarization. The dependence of metamaterial resonances on polarization results in unique amplitude and phase characteristics of the terahertz transmission, providing the basis for polarimetric terahertz devices. We highlight some potential applications for polarimetric devices and present simulations of a terahertz quarter-wave plate and a polarizing terahertz beam splitter. Although this work was performed at terahertz frequencies, it may find applications in other frequency ranges as well.
  • We present experimental and numerical investigations of planar terahertz metamaterial structures designed to interact with the state of polarization. The dependence of metamaterial resonances on polarization results in unique amplitude and phase characteristics of the terahertz transmission, providing the basis for polarimetric terahertz devices. We highlight some potential applications for polarimetric devices and present simulations of a terahertz quarter-wave plate and a polarizing terahertz beam splitter. Although this work was performed at tcrahertz frequencies, it may find applications in other frequency ranges as well.
  • Cited by 1