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Title: Ion-Pair Oligomerization of Chromogenic Triangulenium Cations with Cyanostar-Modified Anions That Controls Emission in Hierarchical Materials

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 East Kirkwood Avenue, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, United States
  2. Nano-Science Center &, Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, København Ø 2100, Denmark
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NSFUNIVERSITY
OSTI Identifier:
1390851
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the American Chemical Society; Journal Volume: 139; Journal Issue: 17
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Qiao, Bo, Hirsch, Brandon E., Lee, Semin, Pink, Maren, Chen, Chun-Hsing, Laursen, Bo W., and Flood, Amar H.. Ion-Pair Oligomerization of Chromogenic Triangulenium Cations with Cyanostar-Modified Anions That Controls Emission in Hierarchical Materials. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/jacs.7b01937.
Qiao, Bo, Hirsch, Brandon E., Lee, Semin, Pink, Maren, Chen, Chun-Hsing, Laursen, Bo W., & Flood, Amar H.. Ion-Pair Oligomerization of Chromogenic Triangulenium Cations with Cyanostar-Modified Anions That Controls Emission in Hierarchical Materials. United States. doi:10.1021/jacs.7b01937.
Qiao, Bo, Hirsch, Brandon E., Lee, Semin, Pink, Maren, Chen, Chun-Hsing, Laursen, Bo W., and Flood, Amar H.. Mon . "Ion-Pair Oligomerization of Chromogenic Triangulenium Cations with Cyanostar-Modified Anions That Controls Emission in Hierarchical Materials". United States. doi:10.1021/jacs.7b01937.
@article{osti_1390851,
title = {Ion-Pair Oligomerization of Chromogenic Triangulenium Cations with Cyanostar-Modified Anions That Controls Emission in Hierarchical Materials},
author = {Qiao, Bo and Hirsch, Brandon E. and Lee, Semin and Pink, Maren and Chen, Chun-Hsing and Laursen, Bo W. and Flood, Amar H.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/jacs.7b01937},
journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
number = 17,
volume = 139,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • A method for the indirect determination of cations by Ion Chromatography (IC) and anions by Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (DCP) is described. The method allows for quantification of suspected impurities in aqueous systems where multiple analyses are desired. The described method is based on the selection of a precipitating agent for the desired analyte. In this study, silver(I) and barium(II) were analyzed indirectly by IC, and chloride and sulfate, by DCP.
  • A mixture of a cationic polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) or PDADMAC, and the anionic ligand diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) can be added to aqueous streams as a water-soluble colloid to bind simultaneously divalent cations, such as Cu[sup 2+] and Pb[sup 2+], and anions, such as CrO[sub 4][sup 2[minus]]. At pH values greater than about 4, most of DTPA is attached electrostatically to the PDADMAC, so that the ligand remains in the retentate in ultrafiltration (UF) separations. Equilibrium dialysis studies show the effectiveness of the PDADMAC-DTPA mixture in binding ions of various types; the data also show that cations such as Ca[sup 2+],more » which do not bind to the ligand, are expelled and become concentrated in the permeate solution passing through the membrane. In equilibrium dialysis and UF experiments, with the PDADMAC-DTPA mixture added to a feed stream containing a mixture of Cu[sup 2+] and CrO[sub 4][sup 2[minus]], the bound cations and anions become highly concentrated in the retentate solution. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.« less
  • The binary mutual neutralization (MN) of a series of 17 cations (O{sub 2}{sup +}, NO{sup +}, NO{sub 2}{sup +}, CO{sup +}, CO{sub 2}{sup +}, Cl{sup +}, Cl{sub 2}{sup +}, SO{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sub 3}{sup +}, C{sub 2}F{sub 5}{sup +}, NH{sub 3}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, D{sub 3}{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, ArH{sup +}, ArD{sup +}) with 3 halide anions (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −}) has been investigated in a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe apparatus using the variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry technique. The MN rate constants of atom-atom reactions are dominated by the chemicalmore » nature of the system (i.e., the specific locations of curve crossings). As the number of atoms in the system increases, the MN rate constants become dominated instead by the physical nature of the system (e.g., the relative velocity of the reactants). For systems involving 4 or more atoms, the 300 K MN rate constants are well described by 2.7 × 10{sup −7} μ{sup −0.5}, where the reduced mass is in Da and the resulting rate constants in cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}. An upper limit to the MN rate constants appears well described by the complex potential model described by Hickman assuming a cross-section to neutralization of 11 000 Å{sup 2} at 300 K, equivalent to 3.5 × 10{sup −7} μ{sup −0.5}.« less
  • Metal ions may be removed from aqueous wastes from metal processing plants and from refineries. They may also be used in concentrating radioactive elements found in dilute, aqueous, nuclear wastes. A new series of silico-titanates and alkali titanates are shown to have specific selectivity for cations of lead, mercury, and cadmium and the dichromate anion in solutions with low and high pH. Furthermore, one particular silico-titanate, TAM-5, was found to be highly selective for Cs[sup +] and Sr[sup 2+] in solutions of 5.7 M Na[sup +] and 0.6 M Oh[sup [minus]]. A high potential exists for these materials for removingmore » Cs[sup +] and Sr[sup 2+] from radioactive aqueous wastes containing high concentrations of Na[sup +] at high and low pH.« less
  • An ESR study of the relative distribution of ion radicals formed in DNA equilibrated with D{sub 2}O and {gamma}-irradiated at 77 K is presented. The ESR spectra of irradiated DNA and polynucleotides (poly(dG){center dot}poly(dC) and poly(dAdT){center dot}poly(dAdT)) were obtained and employed in a computer-assisted analysis for the individual ion-radical distribution. Analysis of spectra as a function of power allowed the separation of the spectra of the pyrimidine anions (T{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}, C{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}) from the spectra of the purine cations (G{sup {sm bullet}+}, A{sup {sm bullet}+}). The spectra of the mononucleotide ion radicals, dCMP{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}, dTMP{sup {sm bullet}{minus}},more » dGMP{sup {sm bullet}+}, and dAMP{sup {sm bullet}+}, were produced in 8 M LiCl glasses. In addition, the spectra of the ion radicals of all of the mononucleotide ion radicals except dAMP{sup +} were simulated by using hyperfine and g tensors from the literature. Basis spectra derived from (1) power saturation experiments, (2) polynucleotide and mononucleotide spectra, (3) spectra of mononucleotides alone, and (4) anisotropic simulations were used to fit the spectra of DNA by use of a linear least-squares analysis. Each of the four separate analyses confirms that the cytosine anion dominates the spectra of DNA at 100 K. Three analyses included the cationic composition, and they strongly favor the guanine cation over the adenine cation. An average of the authors results gives the DNA ion radicals' relative to abundances as ca. 77% C{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}, 23% T{sup {sm bullet}{minus}} for the anions and >90% G{sup {sm bullet}+} for the cations about equal amounts of anions and cations are present. No difference in results is found for DNA irradiated in frozen D{sub 2}O solutions or simply exchanged at 100% D{sub 2}O humidity.« less