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Title: High Voltage LiNi 0.5 Mn 0.3 Co 0.2 O 2 /Graphite Cell Cycled at 4.6 V with a FEC/HFDEC-Based Electrolyte

Abstract

A high voltage LiNi0.5Mn0.3Co0.2O2/graphite cell with a fluorinated electrolyte formulation 1.0 m LiPF6 fluoroethylene carbonate/bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) carbonate is reported and its electrochemical performance is evaluated at cell voltage of 4.6 V. Comparing with its nonfluorinated electrolyte counterpart, the reported fluorinated one shows much improved Coulombic efficiency and capacity retention when a higher cut-off voltage (4.6 V) is applied. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data clearly demonstrate the superior oxidative stability of the new electrolyte. The structural stability of the bulk cathode materials cycled with different electrolytes is extensively studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [2];  [7];  [2]
  1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439-4837 USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road Worcester MA 01609 USA
  2. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439-4837 USA
  3. School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR USA
  4. Applied Physics Program, Northwestern University, Evanston IL 60208 USA
  5. X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439-4837 USA
  6. Applied Physics Program, Northwestern University, Evanston IL 60208 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston IL 60208 USA
  7. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road Worcester MA 01609 USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1389625
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Advanced Energy Materials; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 15
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; LiNi0.5Mn0.3Co0.2O2 cathode; electrode/electrolyte interface; fluorinated electrolytes; oxidation stability; post-test analysis

Citation Formats

He, Meinan, Su, Chi-Cheung, Feng, Zhenxing, Zeng, Li, Wu, Tianpin, Bedzyk, Michael J., Fenter, Paul, Wang, Yan, and Zhang, Zhengcheng. High Voltage LiNi 0.5 Mn 0.3 Co 0.2 O 2 /Graphite Cell Cycled at 4.6 V with a FEC/HFDEC-Based Electrolyte. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201700109.
He, Meinan, Su, Chi-Cheung, Feng, Zhenxing, Zeng, Li, Wu, Tianpin, Bedzyk, Michael J., Fenter, Paul, Wang, Yan, & Zhang, Zhengcheng. High Voltage LiNi 0.5 Mn 0.3 Co 0.2 O 2 /Graphite Cell Cycled at 4.6 V with a FEC/HFDEC-Based Electrolyte. United States. doi:10.1002/aenm.201700109.
He, Meinan, Su, Chi-Cheung, Feng, Zhenxing, Zeng, Li, Wu, Tianpin, Bedzyk, Michael J., Fenter, Paul, Wang, Yan, and Zhang, Zhengcheng. Wed . "High Voltage LiNi 0.5 Mn 0.3 Co 0.2 O 2 /Graphite Cell Cycled at 4.6 V with a FEC/HFDEC-Based Electrolyte". United States. doi:10.1002/aenm.201700109.
@article{osti_1389625,
title = {High Voltage LiNi 0.5 Mn 0.3 Co 0.2 O 2 /Graphite Cell Cycled at 4.6 V with a FEC/HFDEC-Based Electrolyte},
author = {He, Meinan and Su, Chi-Cheung and Feng, Zhenxing and Zeng, Li and Wu, Tianpin and Bedzyk, Michael J. and Fenter, Paul and Wang, Yan and Zhang, Zhengcheng},
abstractNote = {A high voltage LiNi0.5Mn0.3Co0.2O2/graphite cell with a fluorinated electrolyte formulation 1.0 m LiPF6 fluoroethylene carbonate/bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) carbonate is reported and its electrochemical performance is evaluated at cell voltage of 4.6 V. Comparing with its nonfluorinated electrolyte counterpart, the reported fluorinated one shows much improved Coulombic efficiency and capacity retention when a higher cut-off voltage (4.6 V) is applied. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data clearly demonstrate the superior oxidative stability of the new electrolyte. The structural stability of the bulk cathode materials cycled with different electrolytes is extensively studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction.},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201700109},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = 15,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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