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Title: Self-catalyzed core-shell GaAs/GaNAs nanowires grown on patterned Si (111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3]
  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
  2. Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping 58183, Sweden
  3. Graduate Program of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
  4. Graduate Program of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA, Department of NanoEngineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375070
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-15 00:14:04; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Liu, Ren, Yao, Weichuan, Chen, Renjie, Jansson, Mattias, Pan, Janet L., Buyanova, Irina A., Xiang, Jie, Dayeh, Shadi A., and Tu, Charles W.. Self-catalyzed core-shell GaAs/GaNAs nanowires grown on patterned Si (111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4990821.
Liu, Ren, Yao, Weichuan, Chen, Renjie, Jansson, Mattias, Pan, Janet L., Buyanova, Irina A., Xiang, Jie, Dayeh, Shadi A., & Tu, Charles W.. Self-catalyzed core-shell GaAs/GaNAs nanowires grown on patterned Si (111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4990821.
Liu, Ren, Yao, Weichuan, Chen, Renjie, Jansson, Mattias, Pan, Janet L., Buyanova, Irina A., Xiang, Jie, Dayeh, Shadi A., and Tu, Charles W.. 2017. "Self-catalyzed core-shell GaAs/GaNAs nanowires grown on patterned Si (111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4990821.
@article{osti_1375070,
title = {Self-catalyzed core-shell GaAs/GaNAs nanowires grown on patterned Si (111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy},
author = {Liu, Ren and Yao, Weichuan and Chen, Renjie and Jansson, Mattias and Pan, Janet L. and Buyanova, Irina A. and Xiang, Jie and Dayeh, Shadi A. and Tu, Charles W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4990821},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 15, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Bandgap tuning up to 1.3 μm in GaAsSb based nanowires by incorporation of dilute amount of N is reported. Highly vertical GaAs/GaAsSbN/GaAs core-shell configured nanowires were grown for different N contents on Si (111) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed close lattice matching of GaAsSbN with GaAs. Micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) revealed red shift as well as broadening of the spectra attesting to N incorporation in the nanowires. Replication of the 4K PL spectra for several different single nanowires compared to the corresponding nanowire array suggests good compositional homogeneity amongst the nanowires. A large red shift of themore » Raman spectrum and associated symmetric line shape in these nanowires have been attributed to phonon localization at point defects. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the dominance of stacking faults and twins in these nanowires. The lower strain present in these dilute nitride nanowires, as opposed to GaAsSb nanowires having the same PL emission wavelength, and the observation of room temperature PL demonstrate the advantage of the dilute nitride system offers in the nanowire configuration, providing a pathway for realizing nanoscale optoelectronic devices in the telecommunication wavelength region.« less
  • We report a study on self-catalyzed GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) grown on Si(111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning electron microscopy images show that vertical and uniform GaP NWs and GaP/GaNP core/shell NWs are grown on Si(111). The density ranges from {approx}1 x 10{sup 7} to {approx}5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} across the substrate. Typical diameters are {approx}110 nm for GaP NWs and {approx}220 nm for GaP/GaNP NWs. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) signal from the GaP/GaNP core/shell NWs confirms that N is incorporated in the shell and the average N content is {approx}0.9%. The PL low-energy tail is significantlymore » reduced, compared to bulk GaNP.« less
  • Anisotropic selective epitaxy in nanoscale-patterned growth (NPG) by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated on a 355 nm period two-dimensional array of circular holes fabricated in a 30-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} film on a GaAs(001) substrate. The hole diameter ranged from 70 to 150 nm. The small hole diameter and the very thin masking layer stimulated lateral growth over the SiO{sub 2} surface at an early stage of selective epitaxy on this patterned substrate. Lateral overgrowth associated with selective epitaxy, however, did not proceed isotropically along the circular boundary between the open substrate surface and the SiO{sub 2} mask. There was preferential growthmore » direction parallel to <111>B. This anisotropy in the selective epitaxy resulted in the formation of a nanoscale, nontapered, straight-wire-type epitaxial layer (GaAs nanowires), which had a length of up to 1.8 {mu}m for a nominal 200 nm deposition. Every GaAs nanowire had a hexagonal prismatic shape directed along <111>B and was surrounded by six (110) sidewalls. The anisotropy of selective epitaxy and faceting in NPG were affected by the profile of the SiO{sub 2} mask and are interpreted using a minimization of the total surface energy for equilibrium crystal shape.« less
  • The processes of growth of self-catalyzed GaAs crystal nanowires on Si (111) surfaces modified by three different methods are studied. For the technology of production of the GaAs nanowires, molecular-beam epitaxy is used. It is found that, in the range of substrate temperatures between 610 and 630 Degree-Sign C, the surface density of nanowires and their diameter sharply increases, whereas the temperature dependence of the nanowire length exhibits a maximum at 610 Degree-Sign C. An increase in the temperature to 640 Degree-Sign C suppresses the formation of nanowires. The method that provides a means for the fabrication of purely cubicmore » GaAs nanowires is described. A theoretical justification of the formation of the cubic phase in self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires is presented.« less
  • We have demonstrated self-catalyzed GaN{sub x}P{sub 1−x} and GaN{sub x}P{sub 1−x}/GaN{sub y}P{sub 1−y} core/shell nanowire growth by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth window for GaN{sub x}P{sub 1−x} nanowires was observed to be comparable to that of GaP nanowires (∼585 °C to ∼615 °C). Transmission electron microscopy showed a mixture of cubic zincblende phase and hexagonal wurtzite phase along the [111] growth direction in GaN{sub x}P{sub 1−x} nanowires. A temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) study performed on GaN{sub x}P{sub 1−x}/GaN{sub y}P{sub 1−y} core/shell nanowires exhibited an S-shape dependence of the PL peaks. This suggests that at low temperature, the emission stems from N-related localizedmore » states below the conduction band edge in the shell, while at high temperature, the emission stems from band-to-band transition in the shell as well as recombination in the GaN{sub x}P{sub 1−x} core.« less