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Title: Projected drought risk in 1.5°C and 2°C warmer climates

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Research Applications Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA
  2. Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA
  3. Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern Switzerland, Climate and Environmental Physics, University of Bern, Bern Switzerland
  4. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades New York USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375068
Grant/Contract Number:
FC02-97ER62402
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 14; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-06 19:54:23; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lehner, Flavio, Coats, Sloan, Stocker, Thomas F., Pendergrass, Angeline G., Sanderson, Benjamin M., Raible, Christoph C., and Smerdon, Jason E. Projected drought risk in 1.5°C and 2°C warmer climates. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017GL074117.
Lehner, Flavio, Coats, Sloan, Stocker, Thomas F., Pendergrass, Angeline G., Sanderson, Benjamin M., Raible, Christoph C., & Smerdon, Jason E. Projected drought risk in 1.5°C and 2°C warmer climates. United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL074117.
Lehner, Flavio, Coats, Sloan, Stocker, Thomas F., Pendergrass, Angeline G., Sanderson, Benjamin M., Raible, Christoph C., and Smerdon, Jason E. 2017. "Projected drought risk in 1.5°C and 2°C warmer climates". United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL074117.
@article{osti_1375068,
title = {Projected drought risk in 1.5°C and 2°C warmer climates},
author = {Lehner, Flavio and Coats, Sloan and Stocker, Thomas F. and Pendergrass, Angeline G. and Sanderson, Benjamin M. and Raible, Christoph C. and Smerdon, Jason E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2017GL074117},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 14,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 22, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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