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Title: Tunnel allows landfall approach for Troll pipeline

Abstract

A 4-km landfall tunnel was constructed to provide an approach to the rugged Norwegian coast for 36 and 40-in. offshore pipelines in Troll Phase 1 development. The tunnel terminates in 165 m of water with three vertical shaft connections to the seabed. Construction consisted of two main elements: 180 metric ton tie-in spools installed between the offshore pipelines and the piercing shafts, and prefabricated 450 metric ton riser bundles installed in the vertical tunnel piercing shafts. The paper describes the seabed route, the tie-in design approach, and construction on the seabed and underground. First gas is scheduled to flow in April, 1996.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Reinertsen Engineering ANS, Trondheim (Norway)
  2. A/S Norske Shell, Trondheim (Norway)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
136985
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oil and Gas Journal; Journal Volume: 93; Journal Issue: 49; Other Information: PBD: 4 Dec 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; NORWAY; PIPELINES; CONSTRUCTION; TUNNELS; OFFSHORE SITES; NATURAL GAS; TRANSPORT; ROUTING; EQUIPMENT INTERFACES

Citation Formats

Hove, F., and Kuhlmann, H. Tunnel allows landfall approach for Troll pipeline. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Hove, F., & Kuhlmann, H. Tunnel allows landfall approach for Troll pipeline. United States.
Hove, F., and Kuhlmann, H. 1995. "Tunnel allows landfall approach for Troll pipeline". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_136985,
title = {Tunnel allows landfall approach for Troll pipeline},
author = {Hove, F. and Kuhlmann, H.},
abstractNote = {A 4-km landfall tunnel was constructed to provide an approach to the rugged Norwegian coast for 36 and 40-in. offshore pipelines in Troll Phase 1 development. The tunnel terminates in 165 m of water with three vertical shaft connections to the seabed. Construction consisted of two main elements: 180 metric ton tie-in spools installed between the offshore pipelines and the piercing shafts, and prefabricated 450 metric ton riser bundles installed in the vertical tunnel piercing shafts. The paper describes the seabed route, the tie-in design approach, and construction on the seabed and underground. First gas is scheduled to flow in April, 1996.},
doi = {},
journal = {Oil and Gas Journal},
number = 49,
volume = 93,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}
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