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Title: Nuclear Physics Exascale Requirements Review: An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Nuclear Physics, June 15 - 17, 2016, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Abstract

Imagine being able to predict — with unprecedented accuracy and precision — the structure of the proton and neutron, and the forces between them, directly from the dynamics of quarks and gluons, and then using this information in calculations of the structure and reactions of atomic nuclei and of the properties of dense neutron stars (NSs). Also imagine discovering new and exotic states of matter, and new laws of nature, by being able to collect more experimental data than we dream possible today, analyzing it in real time to feed back into an experiment, and curating the data with full tracking capabilities and with fully distributed data mining capabilities. Making this vision a reality would improve basic scientific understanding, enabling us to precisely calculate, for example, the spectrum of gravity waves emitted during NS coalescence, and would have important societal applications in nuclear energy research, stockpile stewardship, and other areas. This review presents the components and characteristics of the exascale computing ecosystems necessary to realize this vision.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [5];  [4];  [8];  [5];  [7];  [7];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [10];  [9] more »;  [12];  [7];  [13];  [14];  [1];  [6];  [15];  [2];  [16];  [9];  [17];  [1];  [18];  [1];  [9];  [14];  [1];  [9];  [14];  [9];  [7];  [9];  [7];  [19];  [9];  [20];  [21];  [14];  [22];  [23];  [9];  [14];  [23];  [14];  [24];  [7];  [14];  [1];  [23];  [1];  [25];  [14];  [6];  [26];  [27];  [12];  [23];  [4];  [23];  [28];  [6];  [12];  [14];  [23];  [6];  [29];  [9];  [9];  [23];  [30];  [23];  [29];  [23];  [31];  [13];  [32];  [7];  [24];  [4];  [9];  [14];  [9];  [9];  [13] « less
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)
  4. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  5. Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  7. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  8. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
  9. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
  10. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy. National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.
  11. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
  12. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Facility for Rare Isotope Beams
  13. Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)
  14. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  15. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
  16. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  17. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)
  18. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)
  19. Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)
  20. Bielefeld Univ. (Germany)
  21. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  22. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center
  23. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  24. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  25. Tri-Univ. Meson Facility (TRIUMF), Vancouver, BC (Canada)
  26. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
  27. College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)
  28. Univ. of Kent,Canterbury (United Kingdom)
  29. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  30. Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
  31. Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States)
  32. Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Nuclear Physics
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
OSTI Identifier:
1369223
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; NEUTRONS; NUCLEAR PHYSICS; PROTONS; NEUTRON STARS

Citation Formats

Carlson, Joseph, Savage, Martin J., Gerber, Richard, Antypas, Katie, Bard, Deborah, Coffey, Richard, Dart, Eli, Dosanjh, Sudip, Hack, James, Monga, Inder, Papka, Michael E., Riley, Katherine, Rotman, Lauren, Straatsma, Tjerk, Wells, Jack, Avakian, Harut, Ayyad, Yassid, Bass, Steffen A., Bazin, Daniel, Boehnlein, Amber, Bollen, Georg, Broussard, Leah J., Calder, Alan, Couch, Sean, Couture, Aaron, Cromaz, Mario, Detmold, William, Detwiler, Jason, Duan, Huaiyu, Edwards, Robert, Engel, Jonathan, Fryer, Chris, Fuller, George M., Gandolfi, Stefano, Gavalian, Gagik, Georgobiani, Dali, Gupta, Rajan, Gyurjyan, Vardan, Hausmann, Marc, Heyes, Graham, Hix, W. Ralph, ito, Mark, Jansen, Gustav, Jones, Richard, Joo, Balint, Kaczmarek, Olaf, Kasen, Dan, Kostin, Mikhail, Kurth, Thorsten, Lauret, Jerome, Lawrence, David, Lin, Huey-Wen, Lin, Meifeng, Mantica, Paul, Maris, Peter, Messer, Bronson, Mittig, Wolfgang, Mosby, Shea, Mukherjee, Swagato, Nam, Hai Ah, navratil, Petr, Nazarewicz, Witek, Ng, Esmond, O'Donnell, Tommy, Orginos, Konstantinos, Pellemoine, Frederique, Petreczky, Peter, Pieper, Steven C., Pinkenburg, Christopher H., Plaster, Brad, Porter, R. Jefferson, Portillo, Mauricio, Pratt, Scott, Purschke, Martin L., Qiang, Ji, Quaglioni, Sofia, Richards, David, Roblin, Yves, Schenke, Bjorn, Schiavilla, Rocco, Schlichting, Soren, Schunck, Nicolas, Steinbrecher, Patrick, Strickland, Michael, Syritsyn, Sergey, Terzic, Balsa, Varner, Robert, Vary, James, Wild, Stefan, Winter, Frank, Zegers, Remco, Zhang, He, Ziegler, Veronique, and Zingale, Michael. Nuclear Physics Exascale Requirements Review: An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Nuclear Physics, June 15 - 17, 2016, Gaithersburg, Maryland. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1369223.
Carlson, Joseph, Savage, Martin J., Gerber, Richard, Antypas, Katie, Bard, Deborah, Coffey, Richard, Dart, Eli, Dosanjh, Sudip, Hack, James, Monga, Inder, Papka, Michael E., Riley, Katherine, Rotman, Lauren, Straatsma, Tjerk, Wells, Jack, Avakian, Harut, Ayyad, Yassid, Bass, Steffen A., Bazin, Daniel, Boehnlein, Amber, Bollen, Georg, Broussard, Leah J., Calder, Alan, Couch, Sean, Couture, Aaron, Cromaz, Mario, Detmold, William, Detwiler, Jason, Duan, Huaiyu, Edwards, Robert, Engel, Jonathan, Fryer, Chris, Fuller, George M., Gandolfi, Stefano, Gavalian, Gagik, Georgobiani, Dali, Gupta, Rajan, Gyurjyan, Vardan, Hausmann, Marc, Heyes, Graham, Hix, W. Ralph, ito, Mark, Jansen, Gustav, Jones, Richard, Joo, Balint, Kaczmarek, Olaf, Kasen, Dan, Kostin, Mikhail, Kurth, Thorsten, Lauret, Jerome, Lawrence, David, Lin, Huey-Wen, Lin, Meifeng, Mantica, Paul, Maris, Peter, Messer, Bronson, Mittig, Wolfgang, Mosby, Shea, Mukherjee, Swagato, Nam, Hai Ah, navratil, Petr, Nazarewicz, Witek, Ng, Esmond, O'Donnell, Tommy, Orginos, Konstantinos, Pellemoine, Frederique, Petreczky, Peter, Pieper, Steven C., Pinkenburg, Christopher H., Plaster, Brad, Porter, R. Jefferson, Portillo, Mauricio, Pratt, Scott, Purschke, Martin L., Qiang, Ji, Quaglioni, Sofia, Richards, David, Roblin, Yves, Schenke, Bjorn, Schiavilla, Rocco, Schlichting, Soren, Schunck, Nicolas, Steinbrecher, Patrick, Strickland, Michael, Syritsyn, Sergey, Terzic, Balsa, Varner, Robert, Vary, James, Wild, Stefan, Winter, Frank, Zegers, Remco, Zhang, He, Ziegler, Veronique, & Zingale, Michael. Nuclear Physics Exascale Requirements Review: An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Nuclear Physics, June 15 - 17, 2016, Gaithersburg, Maryland. United States. doi:10.2172/1369223.
Carlson, Joseph, Savage, Martin J., Gerber, Richard, Antypas, Katie, Bard, Deborah, Coffey, Richard, Dart, Eli, Dosanjh, Sudip, Hack, James, Monga, Inder, Papka, Michael E., Riley, Katherine, Rotman, Lauren, Straatsma, Tjerk, Wells, Jack, Avakian, Harut, Ayyad, Yassid, Bass, Steffen A., Bazin, Daniel, Boehnlein, Amber, Bollen, Georg, Broussard, Leah J., Calder, Alan, Couch, Sean, Couture, Aaron, Cromaz, Mario, Detmold, William, Detwiler, Jason, Duan, Huaiyu, Edwards, Robert, Engel, Jonathan, Fryer, Chris, Fuller, George M., Gandolfi, Stefano, Gavalian, Gagik, Georgobiani, Dali, Gupta, Rajan, Gyurjyan, Vardan, Hausmann, Marc, Heyes, Graham, Hix, W. Ralph, ito, Mark, Jansen, Gustav, Jones, Richard, Joo, Balint, Kaczmarek, Olaf, Kasen, Dan, Kostin, Mikhail, Kurth, Thorsten, Lauret, Jerome, Lawrence, David, Lin, Huey-Wen, Lin, Meifeng, Mantica, Paul, Maris, Peter, Messer, Bronson, Mittig, Wolfgang, Mosby, Shea, Mukherjee, Swagato, Nam, Hai Ah, navratil, Petr, Nazarewicz, Witek, Ng, Esmond, O'Donnell, Tommy, Orginos, Konstantinos, Pellemoine, Frederique, Petreczky, Peter, Pieper, Steven C., Pinkenburg, Christopher H., Plaster, Brad, Porter, R. Jefferson, Portillo, Mauricio, Pratt, Scott, Purschke, Martin L., Qiang, Ji, Quaglioni, Sofia, Richards, David, Roblin, Yves, Schenke, Bjorn, Schiavilla, Rocco, Schlichting, Soren, Schunck, Nicolas, Steinbrecher, Patrick, Strickland, Michael, Syritsyn, Sergey, Terzic, Balsa, Varner, Robert, Vary, James, Wild, Stefan, Winter, Frank, Zegers, Remco, Zhang, He, Ziegler, Veronique, and Zingale, Michael. 2017. "Nuclear Physics Exascale Requirements Review: An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Nuclear Physics, June 15 - 17, 2016, Gaithersburg, Maryland". United States. doi:10.2172/1369223. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369223.
@article{osti_1369223,
title = {Nuclear Physics Exascale Requirements Review: An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Nuclear Physics, June 15 - 17, 2016, Gaithersburg, Maryland},
author = {Carlson, Joseph and Savage, Martin J. and Gerber, Richard and Antypas, Katie and Bard, Deborah and Coffey, Richard and Dart, Eli and Dosanjh, Sudip and Hack, James and Monga, Inder and Papka, Michael E. and Riley, Katherine and Rotman, Lauren and Straatsma, Tjerk and Wells, Jack and Avakian, Harut and Ayyad, Yassid and Bass, Steffen A. and Bazin, Daniel and Boehnlein, Amber and Bollen, Georg and Broussard, Leah J. and Calder, Alan and Couch, Sean and Couture, Aaron and Cromaz, Mario and Detmold, William and Detwiler, Jason and Duan, Huaiyu and Edwards, Robert and Engel, Jonathan and Fryer, Chris and Fuller, George M. and Gandolfi, Stefano and Gavalian, Gagik and Georgobiani, Dali and Gupta, Rajan and Gyurjyan, Vardan and Hausmann, Marc and Heyes, Graham and Hix, W. Ralph and ito, Mark and Jansen, Gustav and Jones, Richard and Joo, Balint and Kaczmarek, Olaf and Kasen, Dan and Kostin, Mikhail and Kurth, Thorsten and Lauret, Jerome and Lawrence, David and Lin, Huey-Wen and Lin, Meifeng and Mantica, Paul and Maris, Peter and Messer, Bronson and Mittig, Wolfgang and Mosby, Shea and Mukherjee, Swagato and Nam, Hai Ah and navratil, Petr and Nazarewicz, Witek and Ng, Esmond and O'Donnell, Tommy and Orginos, Konstantinos and Pellemoine, Frederique and Petreczky, Peter and Pieper, Steven C. and Pinkenburg, Christopher H. and Plaster, Brad and Porter, R. Jefferson and Portillo, Mauricio and Pratt, Scott and Purschke, Martin L. and Qiang, Ji and Quaglioni, Sofia and Richards, David and Roblin, Yves and Schenke, Bjorn and Schiavilla, Rocco and Schlichting, Soren and Schunck, Nicolas and Steinbrecher, Patrick and Strickland, Michael and Syritsyn, Sergey and Terzic, Balsa and Varner, Robert and Vary, James and Wild, Stefan and Winter, Frank and Zegers, Remco and Zhang, He and Ziegler, Veronique and Zingale, Michael},
abstractNote = {Imagine being able to predict — with unprecedented accuracy and precision — the structure of the proton and neutron, and the forces between them, directly from the dynamics of quarks and gluons, and then using this information in calculations of the structure and reactions of atomic nuclei and of the properties of dense neutron stars (NSs). Also imagine discovering new and exotic states of matter, and new laws of nature, by being able to collect more experimental data than we dream possible today, analyzing it in real time to feed back into an experiment, and curating the data with full tracking capabilities and with fully distributed data mining capabilities. Making this vision a reality would improve basic scientific understanding, enabling us to precisely calculate, for example, the spectrum of gravity waves emitted during NS coalescence, and would have important societal applications in nuclear energy research, stockpile stewardship, and other areas. This review presents the components and characteristics of the exascale computing ecosystems necessary to realize this vision.},
doi = {10.2172/1369223},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 2
}

Technical Report:

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  • The additional computing power offered by the planned exascale facilities could be transformational across the spectrum of plasma and fusion research — provided that the new architectures can be efficiently applied to our problem space. The collaboration that will be required to succeed should be viewed as an opportunity to identify and exploit cross-disciplinary synergies. To assess the opportunities and requirements as part of the development of an overall strategy for computing in the exascale era, the Exascale Requirements Review meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) community was convened January 27–29, 2016, with participation from a broad range ofmore » fusion and plasma scientists, specialists in applied mathematics and computer science, and representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its major computing facilities. This report is a summary of that meeting and the preparatory activities for it and includes a wealth of detail to support the findings. Technical opportunities, requirements, and challenges are detailed in this report (and in the recent report on the Workshop on Integrated Simulation). Science applications are described, along with mathematical and computational enabling technologies. Also see http://exascaleage.org/fes/ for more information.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) convened a programmatic Exascale Requirements Review on June 10–12, 2015, in Bethesda, Maryland. This report summarizes the findings, results, and recommendations derived from that meeting. The high-level findings and observations are as follows. Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude — and in some cases greatermore » — than that available currently. The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability of both facilities and researchers to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. Data rates and volumes from experimental facilities are also straining the current HEP infrastructure in its ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. A close integration of high-performance computing (HPC) simulation and data analysis will greatly aid in interpreting the results of HEP experiments. Such an integration will minimize data movement and facilitate interdependent workflows. Long-range planning between HEP and ASCR will be required to meet HEP’s research needs. To best use ASCR HPC resources, the experimental HEP program needs (1) an established, long-term plan for access to ASCR computational and data resources, (2) the ability to map workflows to HPC resources, (3) the ability for ASCR facilities to accommodate workflows run by collaborations potentially comprising thousands of individual members, (4) to transition codes to the next-generation HPC platforms that will be available at ASCR facilities, (5) to build up and train a workforce capable of developing and using simulations and analysis to support HEP scientific research on next-generation systems.« less
  • Understanding the fundamentals of genomic systems or the processes governing impactful weather patterns are examples of the types of simulation and modeling performed on the most advanced computing resources in America. High-performance computing and computational science together provide a necessary platform for the mission science conducted by the Biological and Environmental Research (BER) office at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report reviews BER’s computing needs and their importance for solving some of the toughest problems in BER’s portfolio. BER’s impact on science has been transformative. Mapping the human genome, including the U.S.-supported international Human Genome Project that DOEmore » began in 1987, initiated the era of modern biotechnology and genomics-based systems biology. And since the 1950s, BER has been a core contributor to atmospheric, environmental, and climate science research, beginning with atmospheric circulation studies that were the forerunners of modern Earth system models (ESMs) and by pioneering the implementation of climate codes onto high-performance computers. See http://exascaleage.org/ber/ for more information.« less
  • The widespread use of computing in the American economy would not be possible without a thoughtful, exploratory research and development (R&D) community pushing the performance edge of operating systems, computer languages, and software libraries. These are the tools and building blocks — the hammers, chisels, bricks, and mortar — of the smartphone, the cloud, and the computing services on which we rely. Engineers and scientists need ever-more specialized computing tools to discover new material properties for manufacturing, make energy generation safer and more efficient, and provide insight into the fundamentals of the universe, for example. The research division of themore » U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing and Research (ASCR Research) ensures that these tools and building blocks are being developed and honed to meet the extreme needs of modern science. See also http://exascaleage.org/ascr/ for additional information.« less
  • Computers have revolutionized every aspect of our lives. Yet in science, the most tantalizing applications of computing lie just beyond our reach. The current quest to build an exascale computer with one thousand times the capability of today’s fastest machines (and more than a million times that of a laptop) will take researchers over the next horizon. The field of materials, chemical reactions, and compounds is inherently complex. Imagine millions of new materials with new functionalities waiting to be discovered — while researchers also seek to extend those materials that are known to a dizzying number of new forms. Wemore » could translate massive amounts of data from high precision experiments into new understanding through data mining and analysis. We could have at our disposal the ability to predict the properties of these materials, to follow their transformations during reactions on an atom-by-atom basis, and to discover completely new chemical pathways or physical states of matter. Extending these predictions from the nanoscale to the mesoscale, from the ultrafast world of reactions to long-time simulations to predict the lifetime performance of materials, and to the discovery of new materials and processes will have a profound impact on energy technology. In addition, discovery of new materials is vital to move computing beyond Moore’s law. To realize this vision, more than hardware is needed. New algorithms to take advantage of the increase in computing power, new programming paradigms, and new ways of mining massive data sets are needed as well. This report summarizes the opportunities and the requisite computing ecosystem needed to realize the potential before us. In addition to pursuing new and more complete physical models and theoretical frameworks, this review found that the following broadly grouped areas relevant to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) would directly affect the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) mission need. Simulation, visualization, and data analysis are crucial for advances in energy science and technology. Revolutionary mathematical, software, and algorithm developments are required in all areas of BES science to take advantage of exascale computing architectures and to meet data analysis, management, and workflow needs. In partnership with ASCR, BES has an emerging and pressing need to develop new and disruptive capabilities in data science. More capable and larger high-performance computing (HPC) and data ecosystems are required to support priority research in BES. Continued success in BES research requires developing the next-generation workforce through education and training and by providing sustained career opportunities.« less