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Title: Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the central nervous system of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by mercury, cadmium, and lead

Abstract

The toxicological, physiological and biochemical responses of aquatic crustaceans to heavy metals have been reported by several investigators. Levels of glucose, lactic acid, sodium, potassium, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in the blood of the crab Scylla serrata increased, while glycogen levels in hepatopancreas and muscle decreased after a four-week exposure to mercuric chloride. In fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, enzyme activity was observed to decrease in the hepatopancreas but increased in abdominal muscle after 48 hr cadmium exposure. In the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exposed for 96 hr to cadmium, glutahione (GSH) level and GSH S-transferase activity deceased in the midgut. In crayfish Astacus astacus exposed to sublethal concentrations of lead and cadmium, oxidative enzyme (succine dehydrogenase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase) activities in gills and hepatopancrease decreased. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by organophosphates and organocarbamates in various crustaceans has bee reported. In vivo cadmium exposure caused increases in esterase activities, but mercury exposure decreases these activities in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp Callianassa tyrrhena. The freshwater crab, Barytelphusa guerini, exposed to 0.6 ppm cadmium showed reduced oxygen consumption throughout the experiment whereas AChE activity increased after 4 days but decreased after 15 days. The authors wanted to determine the effectsmore » of cadmium, lead and mercury on AChE activity in central nervous tissue of Procambarus clarkii. This enzyme has the potential for serving both as a biochemical indicator of toxic stress and a sensitive parameter for testing water for the presence of toxicants. These three biologically silent metals have, according to Schweinsberg and Karsa great toxicological significance to humans because their use is widespread. 14 refs., 4 figs.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
135899
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: PBD: Nov 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; MERCURY; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CADMIUM; LEAD; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; ENZYME ACTIVITY; CRUSTACEANS

Citation Formats

Devi, M, and Fingerman, M. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the central nervous system of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by mercury, cadmium, and lead. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1007/BF00203762.
Devi, M, & Fingerman, M. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the central nervous system of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by mercury, cadmium, and lead. United States. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00203762
Devi, M, and Fingerman, M. Wed . "Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the central nervous system of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by mercury, cadmium, and lead". United States. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00203762.
@article{osti_135899,
title = {Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the central nervous system of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by mercury, cadmium, and lead},
author = {Devi, M and Fingerman, M},
abstractNote = {The toxicological, physiological and biochemical responses of aquatic crustaceans to heavy metals have been reported by several investigators. Levels of glucose, lactic acid, sodium, potassium, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in the blood of the crab Scylla serrata increased, while glycogen levels in hepatopancreas and muscle decreased after a four-week exposure to mercuric chloride. In fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, enzyme activity was observed to decrease in the hepatopancreas but increased in abdominal muscle after 48 hr cadmium exposure. In the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exposed for 96 hr to cadmium, glutahione (GSH) level and GSH S-transferase activity deceased in the midgut. In crayfish Astacus astacus exposed to sublethal concentrations of lead and cadmium, oxidative enzyme (succine dehydrogenase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase) activities in gills and hepatopancrease decreased. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by organophosphates and organocarbamates in various crustaceans has bee reported. In vivo cadmium exposure caused increases in esterase activities, but mercury exposure decreases these activities in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp Callianassa tyrrhena. The freshwater crab, Barytelphusa guerini, exposed to 0.6 ppm cadmium showed reduced oxygen consumption throughout the experiment whereas AChE activity increased after 4 days but decreased after 15 days. The authors wanted to determine the effects of cadmium, lead and mercury on AChE activity in central nervous tissue of Procambarus clarkii. This enzyme has the potential for serving both as a biochemical indicator of toxic stress and a sensitive parameter for testing water for the presence of toxicants. These three biologically silent metals have, according to Schweinsberg and Karsa great toxicological significance to humans because their use is widespread. 14 refs., 4 figs.},
doi = {10.1007/BF00203762},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/135899}, journal = {Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology},
number = 5,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {11}
}