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Title: Developing CCUS system models to handle the complexity of multiple sources and sinks: An update on Tasks 5.3 and 5.4

Abstract

This presentation is part of US-China Clean Coal project and describes the impact of power plant cycling, techno economic modeling of combined IGCC and CCS, integrated capacity generation decision making for power utilities, and a new decision support tool for integrated assessment of CCUS.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Clean Coal (FE-20)
OSTI Identifier:
1358179
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24172
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Middleton, Richard Stephen. Developing CCUS system models to handle the complexity of multiple sources and sinks: An update on Tasks 5.3 and 5.4. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1358179.
Middleton, Richard Stephen. Developing CCUS system models to handle the complexity of multiple sources and sinks: An update on Tasks 5.3 and 5.4. United States. doi:10.2172/1358179.
Middleton, Richard Stephen. Mon . "Developing CCUS system models to handle the complexity of multiple sources and sinks: An update on Tasks 5.3 and 5.4". United States. doi:10.2172/1358179. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358179.
@article{osti_1358179,
title = {Developing CCUS system models to handle the complexity of multiple sources and sinks: An update on Tasks 5.3 and 5.4},
author = {Middleton, Richard Stephen},
abstractNote = {This presentation is part of US-China Clean Coal project and describes the impact of power plant cycling, techno economic modeling of combined IGCC and CCS, integrated capacity generation decision making for power utilities, and a new decision support tool for integrated assessment of CCUS.},
doi = {10.2172/1358179},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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