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Title: Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling

Abstract

Tokamak plasmas can feature a large population of energetic particles (EP) from neutral beam injection or fusion reactions. In turn, energetic particles can drive instabilities, which affect the driving EP population leading to a distortion of the original EP distribution function and of quantities that depend on it. The latter include, for example, neutral beam (NB) current drive and plasma heating through EP thermalization. Those effects must be taken into account to enable reliable and quantitative simulations of discharges for present devices as well as predictions for future burning plasmas. Reduced models for EP transport are emerging as an effective tool for long time-scale integrated simulations of tokamak plasmas, possibly including the effects of instabilities on EP dynamics. Available models differ in how EP distribution properties are modified by instabilities, e.g. in terms of gradients in real or phase space. It is therefore crucial to assess to what extent different assumptions in the transport models affect predicted quantities such as EP profile, energy distribution, NB driven current and energy/momentum transfer to the thermal populations. A newly developed kick model, which includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in both real and velocity space, is used in this work tomore » investigate these issues. Coupled to TRANSP simulations, the kick model is used to analyze NB-heated NSTX and DIII-D discharges featuring unstable Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). Results show that instabilities can strongly affect the EP distribution function, and modifications propagate to macroscopic quantities such as NB-driven current profile and NB power transferred to the thermal plasma species. Furthermore, those important aspects are only qualitatively captured by simpler fast ion transport models that are based on radial diffusion of energetic ions only.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1346925
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-09CH11466; FC02-04ER54698
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nuclear Fusion
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0029-5515
Publisher:
IOP Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Podesta, M., Gorelenkova, M., Fredrickson, E. D., Gorelenkov, N. N., and White, R. B. Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1088/0029-5515/56/11/112005.
Podesta, M., Gorelenkova, M., Fredrickson, E. D., Gorelenkov, N. N., & White, R. B. Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling. United States. doi:10.1088/0029-5515/56/11/112005.
Podesta, M., Gorelenkova, M., Fredrickson, E. D., Gorelenkov, N. N., and White, R. B. 2016. "Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling". United States. doi:10.1088/0029-5515/56/11/112005. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1346925.
@article{osti_1346925,
title = {Effects of energetic particle phase space modifications by instabilities on integrated modeling},
author = {Podesta, M. and Gorelenkova, M. and Fredrickson, E. D. and Gorelenkov, N. N. and White, R. B.},
abstractNote = {Tokamak plasmas can feature a large population of energetic particles (EP) from neutral beam injection or fusion reactions. In turn, energetic particles can drive instabilities, which affect the driving EP population leading to a distortion of the original EP distribution function and of quantities that depend on it. The latter include, for example, neutral beam (NB) current drive and plasma heating through EP thermalization. Those effects must be taken into account to enable reliable and quantitative simulations of discharges for present devices as well as predictions for future burning plasmas. Reduced models for EP transport are emerging as an effective tool for long time-scale integrated simulations of tokamak plasmas, possibly including the effects of instabilities on EP dynamics. Available models differ in how EP distribution properties are modified by instabilities, e.g. in terms of gradients in real or phase space. It is therefore crucial to assess to what extent different assumptions in the transport models affect predicted quantities such as EP profile, energy distribution, NB driven current and energy/momentum transfer to the thermal populations. A newly developed kick model, which includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in both real and velocity space, is used in this work to investigate these issues. Coupled to TRANSP simulations, the kick model is used to analyze NB-heated NSTX and DIII-D discharges featuring unstable Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). Results show that instabilities can strongly affect the EP distribution function, and modifications propagate to macroscopic quantities such as NB-driven current profile and NB power transferred to the thermal plasma species. Furthermore, those important aspects are only qualitatively captured by simpler fast ion transport models that are based on radial diffusion of energetic ions only.},
doi = {10.1088/0029-5515/56/11/112005},
journal = {Nuclear Fusion},
number = 11,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

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  • Tokamak plasmas can feature a large population of energetic particles (EP) from neutral beam injection or fusion reactions. In turn, energetic particles can drive instabilities, which affect the driving EP population leading to a distortion of the original EP distribution function and of quantities that depend on it. The latter include, for example, neutral beam (NB) current drive and plasma heating through EP thermalization. Those effects must be taken into account to enable reliable and quantitative simulations of discharges for present devices as well as predictions for future burning plasmas. Reduced models for EP transport are emerging as an effectivemore » tool for long time-scale integrated simulations of tokamak plasmas, possibly including the effects of instabilities on EP dynamics. Available models differ in how EP distribution properties are modified by instabilities, e.g. in terms of gradients in real or phase space. It is therefore crucial to assess to what extent different assumptions in the transport models affect predicted quantities such as EP profile, energy distribution, NB driven current and energy/momentum transfer to the thermal populations. A newly developed kick model, which includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in both real and velocity space, is used in this work to investigate these issues. Coupled to TRANSP simulations, the kick model is used to analyze NB-heated NSTX and DIII-D discharges featuring unstable Alfven eigenmodes (AEs). Results show that instabilities can strongly affect the EP distribution function, and modifications propagate to macroscopic quantities such as NB-driven current profile and NB power transferred to the thermal plasma species. Those important aspects are only qualitatively captured by simpler fast ion transport models that are based on radial diffusion of energetic ions only.« less
  • Tokamak plasmas can feature a large population of energetic particles (EP) from Neutral Beam injection or fusion reactions. In turn, energetic particles can drive instabilities, which affect the driving EP population leading to a distortion of the original EP distribution function and of quantities that depend on it. The latter include, for example, Neutral Beam (NB) current drive and plasma heating through EP thermalization. Those effects must be taken into account to enable reliable and quantitative simulations of discharges for present devices as well as predictions for future burning plasmas. Reduced models for EP transport are emerging as an effectivemore » tool for long time-scale integrated simulations of tokamak plasmas, possibly including the effects of instabilities on EP dynamics. Available models differ in how EP distribution properties are modifed by instabilities, e.g. in terms of gradients in real or phase space. It is therefore crucial to assess to what extent different assumptions in the transport models affect predicted quantities such as EP profile, energy distribution, NB driven current and energy/momentum transfer to the thermal populations. A newly developed kick model, which includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in both real and velocity space, is used in this work to investigate these issues. Coupled to TRANSP simulations, the kick model is used to analyze NB-heated NSTX and DIII-D discharges featuring unstable Alfven eigenmodes (AEs). Results show that instabilities can strongly affect the EP distribution function, and modifications propagate to macroscopic quantities such as NB-driven current profile and NB power transferred to the thermal plasma species. Those important aspects are only qualitatively captured by simpler fast ion transport models that are based on radial diffusion of energetic ions only.« less
  • Phase-space topology of energetic particles in tokamak plasma with arbitrary shape of cross section is studied based upon the guiding center theory. Important phase-space boundaries such as prompt loss boundary, trapped passing boundary, and other boundaries between classes of nonstandard orbits (e.g., pinch and stagnation orbits) are studied. This phase-space topology information is applied to the study of anomalous phase-space diffusion due to finite amplitude Alfven wave fluctuations of energetic particles. The separatrix between trapped and circulating particles contributes dominantly to the losses.
  • The transformation of kinetically unstable plasma eigenmodes into hole-clump pairs with temporally evolving carrier frequencies was recently attributed to the emergence of an intermediate stage in the mode evolution cycle, that of an unmodulated plateau in the phase space distribution of fast particles. The role of the plateau as the hole-clump breeding ground is further substantiated in this article via consideration of its linear and nonlinear stability in the presence of fast particle collisions and sources, which are known to affect the production rates and subsequent frequency sweeping of holes and clumps. In particular, collisional relaxation, as mediated by e.g.more » velocity space diffusion or even simple Krook-type collisions, is found to inhibit hole-clump generation and detachment from the plateau, as it should. On the other hand, slowing down of the fast particles turns out to have an asymmetrically destabilizing/stabilizing effect, which explains the well-known result that collisional drag enhances holes and their sweeping rates but suppresses clumps. It is further demonstrated that relaxation of the plateau edge gradients has only a minor quantitative effect and does not change the plateau stability qualitatively, unless the edge region extends far into the plateau shelf and the corresponding Landau pole needs to be taken into account.« less