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Title: Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker

Abstract

Autosomal dominant inherited myotonia congenita Thomsen (MC) and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia Becker (GM) are non-dystropic muscle disorders in which the symptom myotonia is based on an increased excitability of the muscle fiber membrane due to a reduced sarcolemmal chloride conductance. Affected individuals exhibit myotonic muscle stiffness in all skeletal muscles and a transient muscle weakness is particularly pronounced in the arms and hands of probands with the disorder GM. Recently we have shown linkage of the disorders MC and GM to the gene CLCN1 coding for the skeletal muscle chloride channel on chromosome 7 in German families. In addition we presented data supporting the hypothesis that GM is a genetically homogeneous disorder. Data are presented about an extended screen for mutations in the CLCN1 gene for our MC and GM population. We identified mainly missense mutations leading to altered amino acid codons. The previously described F413C mutation is by far the most common mutation for GM and is found in one family only (P480L, G482R, R496S). In addition we found 5{prime} donor and 3{prime} acceptor splice site mutations at various intron-exon boundaries, as well as a deletion mutation of 14 bp in exon 13. This deletion mutation is themore » second most common mutation in the GM population with a frequency of 8%. So far we have not determined sites of predominance of mutations in the CLCN1 gene, which could give us more insight into the regions critical for the function of the channel and the fact that the mutations in the gene may lead to dominant and recessive inheritance.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Universitaet Marburg, (Germany) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
134234
Report Number(s):
CONF-941009-
Journal ID: AJHGAG; ISSN 0002-9297; TRN: 95:005313-0970
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Human Genetics; Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: Suppl.3; Conference: 44. annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Montreal (Canada), 18-22 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; PATIENTS; HEREDITARY DISEASES; PHENOTYPE; GENES; GENE MUTATIONS; SPLICING; MUTATION FREQUENCY; STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS; MUSCLES; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 7; GENETIC MAPPING; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; AMINO ACIDS; CODONS; EXONS; INTRONS

Citation Formats

Koch, M.C., Meyer-Kline, C., and Otto, M.. Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Koch, M.C., Meyer-Kline, C., & Otto, M.. Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker. United States.
Koch, M.C., Meyer-Kline, C., and Otto, M.. 1994. "Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_134234,
title = {Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker},
author = {Koch, M.C. and Meyer-Kline, C. and Otto, M.},
abstractNote = {Autosomal dominant inherited myotonia congenita Thomsen (MC) and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia Becker (GM) are non-dystropic muscle disorders in which the symptom myotonia is based on an increased excitability of the muscle fiber membrane due to a reduced sarcolemmal chloride conductance. Affected individuals exhibit myotonic muscle stiffness in all skeletal muscles and a transient muscle weakness is particularly pronounced in the arms and hands of probands with the disorder GM. Recently we have shown linkage of the disorders MC and GM to the gene CLCN1 coding for the skeletal muscle chloride channel on chromosome 7 in German families. In addition we presented data supporting the hypothesis that GM is a genetically homogeneous disorder. Data are presented about an extended screen for mutations in the CLCN1 gene for our MC and GM population. We identified mainly missense mutations leading to altered amino acid codons. The previously described F413C mutation is by far the most common mutation for GM and is found in one family only (P480L, G482R, R496S). In addition we found 5{prime} donor and 3{prime} acceptor splice site mutations at various intron-exon boundaries, as well as a deletion mutation of 14 bp in exon 13. This deletion mutation is the second most common mutation in the GM population with a frequency of 8%. So far we have not determined sites of predominance of mutations in the CLCN1 gene, which could give us more insight into the regions critical for the function of the channel and the fact that the mutations in the gene may lead to dominant and recessive inheritance.},
doi = {},
journal = {American Journal of Human Genetics},
number = Suppl.3,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 9
}
  • Thomsen (autosomal dominant) and Becker (autosomal recessive) myotonias are characterized by the inability for muscle relaxation after voluntary, mechanical, or electrical stimulation. Families with both diseases have been linked to the skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLC1) on chromosome 7q35; however, only 2 gene mutations have been identified, and the reasons underlying the alternative dominant or recessive inheritance are not clear. We used linkage analysis and SSCP of 23 exons to screen 8 families (56 individuals) and 7 isolated cases with the diagnosis of Thomsen/Becker myotonia. A novel mutation (1290M) in exon 8 was detected in a family with Thomsen disease.more » Three additional families showed the previously described G230E change. Thus, chloride channel mutations could be identified in 4/5 families showing dominant inheritance. We were able to exclude linkage to the CLC1 gene in the fifth family. In patients with recessive Becker disease, an isolated case had two unique conformers, one causing a novel A437T change in exon 12. We also identified the previously reported F413C change in a second family. We found significant differences in the clinical picture between families with different mutations but also in families with the same mutation. Our data indicates that DNA studies are critical for correct diagnosis of the myotonias.« less
  • Autosomal dominant myotonia congenita and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia (GM) are genetic disorders characterized by the symptom of myotonia, which is based on an electrical instability of the muscle fiber membrane. Recently, these two phenotypes have been associated with mutations in the major muscle chloride channel gene CLCN1 on human chromosome 7q35. We have systematically screened the open reading frame of the CLCN1 gene for mutations by SSC analysis (SSCA) in a panel of 24 families and 17 single unrelated patients with human myotonia. By direct sequencing of aberrant SSCA conformers we revealed 15 different mutations in a total ofmore » 18 unrelated families and 13 single patients. Of these, 10 were novel (7 missense mutations, 2 mutations leading to frameshift, and 1 mutation predicted to affect normal splicing). In our overall sample of 94 GM chromsomes we were able to detect 48 (50%) mutant GM alleles. Three mutations (F413C, R894X, and a 14-bp deletion in exon 13) account for 32% of the GM chromosomes in the German population. Our finding that A437T is probably a polymorphism is in contrast to a recent report that the recessive phenotype GM is associated with this amino acid change. We also demonstrate that the R894X mutation may act as a recessive or a dominant mutation in the CLCN1 gene, probably depending on the genetic background. Functional expression of the R894X mutant in Xenopus oocytes revealed a large reduction, but not complete abolition, of chloride currents. Further, it had a weak dominant negative effect on wild-type currents in coexpression studies. Reduction of currents predicted for heterozygous carriers are close to the borderline value, which is sufficient to elicit myotonia. 31 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.« less
  • Biglycan is a small proteoglycan expressed mainly in cells of connective tissue, including chondrocytes, ostocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells. The biglycan cDNA is 1,685 bp long. The biglycan gene was amplified in six segments by using nested PCR. Primers were synthesized to amplify exons 2-8 of the biglycan gene. Exon 1 was not amplified, as it consists entirely of 5[prime] untranslated sequence. Each exon was separately amplified, except for exons 5-7, which, because of their small size, were amplified in two segments and were subjected to SSCP analysis. Results indicate the presence of two different haplotypes for exon 2more » and three different haplotypes for exon 4. Further SSCP analysis of control samples from nine females and one male confirmed that the exon 2 and exon 4 haplotypes consist of polymorphisms, rather than of mutations that specifically affect this patient population. Our results support recently described work that proposes that the biglycan gene may not be involved in X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata. The absence of mutations in the biglycan gene in X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, dyskeratosis congenita, and incontinentia pigmenti suggest it is highly unlikely that mutations in this gene are responsible for any of these disorders.« less
  • Mapping studies have indicated that over two dozen genetic diseases lie on Xq28, the distal long arm of the X chromosome. In most cases the responsible gene has not yet been isolated. Most of these diseases occur at low frequency, and together with small family sizes and the lack of associated cytogenetic aberrations, this characteristic has made isolation of the genes difficult. Identification of the genes responsible for inherited disorders should eventually lead to a greater understanding of biochemical and developmental pathways. We and others are attempting to find these genes by examining genes that are candidates by virtue ofmore » their map location. One candidate is the Xq28-linked gene MPP-1, which encodes the p55 protein. In this study, we asked whether mutations in the p55 gene are present in patients affected with the Xq28-linked disorders dyskeratosis congenita and Emergy-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. The p55 cDNA is [approx]2 kb in length. The strategy for mutation detection in this sequence involved reverse transciption (RT)-PCR amplification of patient and control cDNA, yielding five sets of overlapping fragments, each set consisting of 400 bp, followed by SSCP analysis of each fragment. In no case was a true mutation in the p55 gene discovered. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that mutations in the p55 gene are responsible for any cases of dyskeratosis congenita or Emergy-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.« less
  • Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealedmore » a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.« less