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Title: Emissions model of waste treatment operations at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

Abstract

An integrated model of the waste treatment systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) was developed using a commercially-available process simulation software (ASPEN Plus) to calculate atmospheric emissions of hazardous chemicals for use in an application for an environmental permit to operate (PTO). The processes covered by the model are the Process Equipment Waste evaporator, High Level Liquid Waste evaporator, New Waste Calcining Facility and Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal facility. The processes are described along with the model and its assumptions. The model calculates emissions of NO{sub x}, CO, volatile acids, hazardous metals, and organic chemicals. Some calculated relative emissions are summarized and insights on building simulations are discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
114586
Report Number(s):
INEL-95/0161
ON: DE96001181; TRN: 95:024404
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-94ID13223
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; IDAHO CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; AEROSOL WASTES; MONITORING; A CODES

Citation Formats

Schindler, R.E. Emissions model of waste treatment operations at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/114586.
Schindler, R.E. Emissions model of waste treatment operations at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. United States. doi:10.2172/114586.
Schindler, R.E. Wed . "Emissions model of waste treatment operations at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant". United States. doi:10.2172/114586. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/114586.
@article{osti_114586,
title = {Emissions model of waste treatment operations at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant},
author = {Schindler, R.E.},
abstractNote = {An integrated model of the waste treatment systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) was developed using a commercially-available process simulation software (ASPEN Plus) to calculate atmospheric emissions of hazardous chemicals for use in an application for an environmental permit to operate (PTO). The processes covered by the model are the Process Equipment Waste evaporator, High Level Liquid Waste evaporator, New Waste Calcining Facility and Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal facility. The processes are described along with the model and its assumptions. The model calculates emissions of NO{sub x}, CO, volatile acids, hazardous metals, and organic chemicals. Some calculated relative emissions are summarized and insights on building simulations are discussed.},
doi = {10.2172/114586},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Technical Report:

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