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Title: Addiction circuitry in the human brain (*).

Abstract

A major challenge in understanding substance-use disorders lies in uncovering why some individuals become addicted when exposed to drugs, whereas others do not. Although genetic, developmental, and environmental factors are recognized as major contributors to a person's risk of becoming addicted, the neurobiological processes that underlie this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Imaging studies suggest that individual variations in key dopamine-modulated brain circuits, including circuits involved in reward, memory, executive function, and motivation, contribute to some of the differences in addiction vulnerability. A better understanding of the main circuits affected by chronic drug use and the influence of social stressors, developmental trajectories, and genetic background on these circuits is bound to lead to a better understanding of addiction and to more effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of substance-use disorders.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY (BNL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE SC OFFICE OF SCIENCE (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1038102
Report Number(s):
BNL-96843-2012-JA
R&D Project: MO-085; KP1602010; TRN: US201208%%287
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 52
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; BRAIN; DOPAMINE; DRUG ABUSE; NEUROLOGY; VULNERABILITY; conditioning; executive function; accumbens; dorsal striatum; orbitofrontal cortex; cingulate gyrus

Citation Formats

Volkow, N.D., Wang, G., Volkow, N.D., Wang, G.-J., Fowler, J.S., and Tomasi, D. Addiction circuitry in the human brain (*).. United States: N. p., 2011. Web.
Volkow, N.D., Wang, G., Volkow, N.D., Wang, G.-J., Fowler, J.S., & Tomasi, D. Addiction circuitry in the human brain (*).. United States.
Volkow, N.D., Wang, G., Volkow, N.D., Wang, G.-J., Fowler, J.S., and Tomasi, D. Tue . "Addiction circuitry in the human brain (*).". United States.
@article{osti_1038102,
title = {Addiction circuitry in the human brain (*).},
author = {Volkow, N.D. and Wang, G. and Volkow, N.D. and Wang, G.-J. and Fowler, J.S. and Tomasi, D.},
abstractNote = {A major challenge in understanding substance-use disorders lies in uncovering why some individuals become addicted when exposed to drugs, whereas others do not. Although genetic, developmental, and environmental factors are recognized as major contributors to a person's risk of becoming addicted, the neurobiological processes that underlie this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Imaging studies suggest that individual variations in key dopamine-modulated brain circuits, including circuits involved in reward, memory, executive function, and motivation, contribute to some of the differences in addiction vulnerability. A better understanding of the main circuits affected by chronic drug use and the influence of social stressors, developmental trajectories, and genetic background on these circuits is bound to lead to a better understanding of addiction and to more effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of substance-use disorders.},
doi = {},
journal = {Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology},
number = ,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {9}
}