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Title: Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

Abstract

Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Guelph
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program; USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1037650
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 3rd Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference, Atlanta, GA, USA, 20120303, 20120306
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ADHESION; ADVECTION; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; BAFFLES; BIOREMEDIATION; FLOW RATE; FLUID FLOW; HARVESTING; HYDRODYNAMICS; MASS TRANSFER; MORPHOLOGY; PRODUCTION; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; biofilms; microfluidics

Citation Formats

Kumar, Aloke, Karig, David K, Neethirajan, Suresh, Suresh, Anil K, Srijanto, Bernadeta R, Mukherjee, Partha P, Retterer, Scott T, and Doktycz, Mitchel John. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Kumar, Aloke, Karig, David K, Neethirajan, Suresh, Suresh, Anil K, Srijanto, Bernadeta R, Mukherjee, Partha P, Retterer, Scott T, & Doktycz, Mitchel John. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices. United States.
Kumar, Aloke, Karig, David K, Neethirajan, Suresh, Suresh, Anil K, Srijanto, Bernadeta R, Mukherjee, Partha P, Retterer, Scott T, and Doktycz, Mitchel John. 2012. "Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1037650,
title = {Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices},
author = {Kumar, Aloke and Karig, David K and Neethirajan, Suresh and Suresh, Anil K and Srijanto, Bernadeta R and Mukherjee, Partha P and Retterer, Scott T and Doktycz, Mitchel John},
abstractNote = {Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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