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Title: Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

Abstract

This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in TNT-contaminated soils on Group 61 at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP). The soils in this group were contaminated more than 40 years ago. In this study, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled from 15 locations and analyzed to determine TNT uptake by plants under natural field conditions. Plant materials were separated by species if more than one species was present at a sampling location. Standard methods were used to determine concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. No. explosives were detected in the aboveground portion of any plant sample. However, the results indicate that TNT, 2-amino DNT, and/or 4-amino DNT were found in some root samples of false boneset (Kuhnia eupatorioides), teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris), and bromegrass (Bromus inermis). It is possible that slight soil contamination remained on the roots, especially in the case of the very fine roots for species like bromegrass, where washing was difficult. The presence of 2-amino DNT and 4-amino DNT, which could be plant metabolites of TNT, increases the likelihood that explosives were taken up by plant roots, asmore » opposed to their presence resulting from external soil contamination.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)|[Univ., of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept., of Agronomy
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Department of Defense, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10159743
Report Number(s):
ANL/ESD/TM-65
ON: DE94013721
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jan 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; TNT; UPTAKE; SOILS; POLLUTION; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; PLANTS; MILITARY FACILITIES; ROOTS; 400102; 450100; 540220; CHEMICAL AND SPECTRAL PROCEDURES; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIONS AND EXPLOSIVES; CHEMICALS MONITORING AND TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Schneider, J.F., Tomczyk, N.A., Zellmer, S.D., and Banwart, W.L. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10159743.
Schneider, J.F., Tomczyk, N.A., Zellmer, S.D., & Banwart, W.L. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant. United States. doi:10.2172/10159743.
Schneider, J.F., Tomczyk, N.A., Zellmer, S.D., and Banwart, W.L. Sat . "Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant". United States. doi:10.2172/10159743. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10159743.
@article{osti_10159743,
title = {Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant},
author = {Schneider, J.F. and Tomczyk, N.A. and Zellmer, S.D. and Banwart, W.L.},
abstractNote = {This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in TNT-contaminated soils on Group 61 at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP). The soils in this group were contaminated more than 40 years ago. In this study, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled from 15 locations and analyzed to determine TNT uptake by plants under natural field conditions. Plant materials were separated by species if more than one species was present at a sampling location. Standard methods were used to determine concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. No. explosives were detected in the aboveground portion of any plant sample. However, the results indicate that TNT, 2-amino DNT, and/or 4-amino DNT were found in some root samples of false boneset (Kuhnia eupatorioides), teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris), and bromegrass (Bromus inermis). It is possible that slight soil contamination remained on the roots, especially in the case of the very fine roots for species like bromegrass, where washing was difficult. The presence of 2-amino DNT and 4-amino DNT, which could be plant metabolites of TNT, increases the likelihood that explosives were taken up by plant roots, as opposed to their presence resulting from external soil contamination.},
doi = {10.2172/10159743},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

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