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Title: PRECIPITATION-REGULATED STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES

Galaxy growth depends critically on the interplay between radiative cooling of cosmic gas and the resulting energetic feedback that cooling triggers. This interplay has proven exceedingly difficult to model, even with large supercomputer simulations, because of its complexity. Nevertheless, real galaxies are observed to obey simple scaling relations among their primary observable characteristics. Here we show that a generic emergent property of the interplay between cooling and feedback can explain the observed scaling relationships between a galaxy's stellar mass, its total mass, and its chemical enrichment level, as well as the relationship between the average orbital velocity of its stars and the mass of its central black hole. These relationships naturally result from any feedback mechanism that strongly heats a galaxy's circumgalactic gas in response to precipitation of colder clouds out of that gas, because feedback then suspends the gas in a marginally precipitating state.
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [2]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22518913
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 808; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; CLOUDS; GALAXIES; MASS; PRECIPITATION; RADIATIVE COOLING; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; VELOCITY