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Title: Effects of γ-ray radiation on two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanomechanical resonators

We report on experimental investigation and analysis of γ-ray radiation effects on two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) drumhead nanomechanical resonators vibrating at megahertz frequencies. Given calibrated dosages of γ-ray radiation of ∼5000 photons with energy at 662 keV, upon exposure over 24 or 12 h, all the MoS{sub 2} resonators exhibit ∼0.5–2.1% resonance frequency upshifts due to the ionizing γ-ray induced charges and their interactions. The devices show γ-ray photon responsivity of ∼30–82 Hz/photon, with an intrinsic γ-ray sensitivity (limit of detection) estimated to approach ∼0.02–0.05 photon. After exposure expires, resonance frequencies return to an ordinary tendency where the frequency variations are dominated by long-term drift. These γ-ray radiation induced frequency shifts are distinctive from those due to pressure variation or surface adsorption mechanisms. The measurements and analyses show that MoS{sub 2} resonators are robust yet sensitive to very low dosage γ-ray, demonstrating a potential for ultrasensitive detection and early alarm of radiation in the very low dosage regime.
Authors:
;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2]
  1. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case School of Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22489300
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2016 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ADSORPTION; DETECTION; KEV RANGE 100-1000; MOLYBDENUM SULFIDES; PHOTONS; RESONANCE; RESONATORS; SENSITIVITY; SURFACES; TWO-DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS