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Title: ‘Wasteaware’ benchmark indicators for integrated sustainable waste management in cities

Highlights: • Solid waste management (SWM) is a key utility service, but data is often lacking. • Measuring their SWM performance helps a city establish priorities for action. • The Wasteaware benchmark indicators: measure both technical and governance aspects. • Have been developed over 5 years and tested in more than 50 cities on 6 continents. • Enable consistent comparison between cities and countries and monitoring progress. - Abstract: This paper addresses a major problem in international solid waste management, which is twofold: a lack of data, and a lack of consistent data to allow comparison between cities. The paper presents an indicator set for integrated sustainable waste management (ISWM) in cities both North and South, to allow benchmarking of a city’s performance, comparing cities and monitoring developments over time. It builds on pioneering work for UN-Habitat’s solid waste management in the World’s cities. The comprehensive analytical framework of a city’s solid waste management system is divided into two overlapping ‘triangles’ – one comprising the three physical components, i.e. collection, recycling, and disposal, and the other comprising three governance aspects, i.e. inclusivity; financial sustainability; and sound institutions and proactive policies. The indicator set includes essential quantitative indicators as well asmore » qualitative composite indicators. This updated and revised ‘Wasteaware’ set of ISWM benchmark indicators is the cumulative result of testing various prototypes in more than 50 cities around the world. This experience confirms the utility of indicators in allowing comprehensive performance measurement and comparison of both ‘hard’ physical components and ‘soft’ governance aspects; and in prioritising ‘next steps’ in developing a city’s solid waste management system, by identifying both local strengths that can be built on and weak points to be addressed. The Wasteaware ISWM indicators are applicable to a broad range of cities with very different levels of income and solid waste management practices. Their wide application as a standard methodology will help to fill the historical data gap.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ; ;  [1] ;  [7] ;  [8]
  1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
  2. Education and Competence Studies, Wageningen University and Research Centre (Netherlands)
  3. Independent Consultant (Saint Lucia)
  4. School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom)
  5. RWA Group, Sofia (Bulgaria)
  6. WASTE, Gouda (Netherlands)
  7. Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH (GIZ), Cairo (Egypt)
  8. GIZ, Eschborn (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22443619
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Waste Management; Journal Volume: 35; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; BENCHMARKS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; INCOME; RECYCLING; SOLID WASTES; SUSTAINABILITY; URBAN AREAS; WASTE MANAGEMENT