skip to main content

Title: NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 130427A ESTABLISH A SINGLE COMPONENT SYNCHROTRON AFTERGLOW ORIGIN FOR THE LATE OPTICAL TO MULTI-GEV EMISSION

GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (∼1.5 and 5 days). This range, where afterglow observations were previously not possible, bridges an important spectral gap. Combined with Swift, Fermi, and ground-based optical data, NuSTAR observations unambiguously establish a single afterglow spectral component from optical to multi-GeV energies a day after the event, which is almost certainly synchrotron radiation. Such an origin of the late-time Fermi/Large Area Telescope >10 GeV photons requires revisions in our understanding of collisionless relativistic shock physics.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ; ; ; ;  [3] ; ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ; ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ; ;  [12] ;  [13] ;  [14]
  1. Astrophysics Office/ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)
  2. Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra'anana 43537 (Israel)
  3. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
  4. Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  5. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)
  6. Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)
  7. CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)
  8. Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  9. DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark)
  10. Code 7653, National Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)
  11. Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)
  12. INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)
  13. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool Science Park, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom)
  14. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364101
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 779; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; AFTERGLOW; ASTROPHYSICS; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; COSMIC PHOTONS; GALAXIES; GEV RANGE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; RELATIVISTIC RANGE; SHOCK WAVES; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; TELESCOPES