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Title: Impact of electron irradiation on electron holographic potentiometry

While electron holography in the transmission electron microscope offers the possibility to measure maps of the electrostatic potential of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions, these measurements are known to underestimate the absolute value of the potential, especially in GaN. We have varied the dose rates of electron irradiation over several orders of magnitude and observed strong variations of the holographically detected voltages. Overall, the results indicate that the electron beam generates electrical currents within the specimens primarily by the photovoltaic effect and due to secondary electron emission. These currents have to be considered for a quantitative interpretation of electron holographic measurements, as their negligence contributes to large parts in the observed discrepancy between the measured and expected potential values in GaN.
Authors:
; ;  [1] ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ; ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)
  2. Technische Universität Berlin, Zentraleinrichtung für Elektronenmikroskopie, Strae des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)
  3. Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibnitz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
  4. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22311044
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; DOSE RATES; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRON EMISSION; GALLIUM NITRIDES; HOLOGRAPHY; IRRADIATION; PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECT; POTENTIOMETRY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY