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Title: A farewell to arms: using X-ray synchrotron imaging to investigate autotomy in brittle stars

Abstract

Autotomy, the self-induced loss of a body structure, occurs in every living class of echinoderms and is related to the remarkable regeneration capabilities of the group. It is particularly prevalent in brittle stars (Class Ophiuroidea). Autotomy is facilitated by mutable collagenous tissue (MCT), which undergoes nervous system-mediated changes in tensile stiffness, tensile strength, and viscosity. Previous investigations of autotomy have been based on observations of the external surface, surgical manipulation of internal structures, or data on the morphology of structures post-autotomy. We used fast phase-contrast X-ray synchrotron imaging to visualize full autotomy events in vivo in the arms of specimens of the brittle star Ophioderma brevispina. This method requires no chemical or surgical manipulation and enabled us to identify several key stages in the autotomy process. We used this methodology to observe critical changes within the internal structure of the arm as it transitions from a functional mechanical apparatus to a dysfunctional disarticulated state. This method is the first in which the full intersegmental plane of the arm can be observed during autotomy. In conclusion, it can be applied to visualize autotomy and motion in vivo in other brittle star taxa, as well as in other groups such as asteroidsmore » and arthropods.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
  3. Vandebilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA (United States); Pitzer College, Claremont, CA (United States); Scripps College, Claremont, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1572904
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Zoomorphology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 138; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0720-213X
Publisher:
Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Autotomy; Mutable collagenous tissue; Ophiuroidea; Synchrotron imaging

Citation Formats

Clark, Elizabeth G., Fezzaa, K., Burke, J. E., Racicot, R. A., Shaw, J. O., Westacott, S., and Briggs, D. E. G. A farewell to arms: using X-ray synchrotron imaging to investigate autotomy in brittle stars. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1007/s00435-019-00451-7.
Clark, Elizabeth G., Fezzaa, K., Burke, J. E., Racicot, R. A., Shaw, J. O., Westacott, S., & Briggs, D. E. G. A farewell to arms: using X-ray synchrotron imaging to investigate autotomy in brittle stars. United States. doi:10.1007/s00435-019-00451-7.
Clark, Elizabeth G., Fezzaa, K., Burke, J. E., Racicot, R. A., Shaw, J. O., Westacott, S., and Briggs, D. E. G. Wed . "A farewell to arms: using X-ray synchrotron imaging to investigate autotomy in brittle stars". United States. doi:10.1007/s00435-019-00451-7.
@article{osti_1572904,
title = {A farewell to arms: using X-ray synchrotron imaging to investigate autotomy in brittle stars},
author = {Clark, Elizabeth G. and Fezzaa, K. and Burke, J. E. and Racicot, R. A. and Shaw, J. O. and Westacott, S. and Briggs, D. E. G.},
abstractNote = {Autotomy, the self-induced loss of a body structure, occurs in every living class of echinoderms and is related to the remarkable regeneration capabilities of the group. It is particularly prevalent in brittle stars (Class Ophiuroidea). Autotomy is facilitated by mutable collagenous tissue (MCT), which undergoes nervous system-mediated changes in tensile stiffness, tensile strength, and viscosity. Previous investigations of autotomy have been based on observations of the external surface, surgical manipulation of internal structures, or data on the morphology of structures post-autotomy. We used fast phase-contrast X-ray synchrotron imaging to visualize full autotomy events in vivo in the arms of specimens of the brittle star Ophioderma brevispina. This method requires no chemical or surgical manipulation and enabled us to identify several key stages in the autotomy process. We used this methodology to observe critical changes within the internal structure of the arm as it transitions from a functional mechanical apparatus to a dysfunctional disarticulated state. This method is the first in which the full intersegmental plane of the arm can be observed during autotomy. In conclusion, it can be applied to visualize autotomy and motion in vivo in other brittle star taxa, as well as in other groups such as asteroids and arthropods.},
doi = {10.1007/s00435-019-00451-7},
journal = {Zoomorphology},
number = 3,
volume = 138,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}

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