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Title: Reconstruction and analysis of exploding wire particle trajectories via automatic calibration of stereo images

Abstract

Quantitative understanding of the physics of dust or granular matter transport significantly impacts several aspects of burning plasma science and technology. Here, this work takes machine vision techniques popular in robotics and self-driving cars and applies them to identification and analysis of microparticles generated from exploding wires. Using only the image frames and knowledge of the intrinsic properties of the cameras, a Python code was written to identify the particles, automatically calibrate the relative image positions, and extract trajectory data. After identifying approximately 50 particles based on the timing of secondary particle explosions, the eight point and random sample consensus algorithms were used to determine the geometric correlation between the cameras. Over 100 particle matches were found between the two camera views. These correlated trajectories were used in subsequent 3D track reconstruction and analysis of the physics behind the particle motion. The 3D reconstruction resulted in accurate positioning of the particles with respect to the experimental setup. The particle motion was consistent with the effects of a 1 g gravitational field modified by drag forces. Lastly, the methods and analyses presented here can be used in many facets of high temperature plasma diagnostics.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC). Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1565813
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-19-29177
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; Magnetic Fusion Energy

Citation Formats

Szott, Matthew, Wang, Zhehui, and Ruzic, David N. Reconstruction and analysis of exploding wire particle trajectories via automatic calibration of stereo images. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5039373.
Szott, Matthew, Wang, Zhehui, & Ruzic, David N. Reconstruction and analysis of exploding wire particle trajectories via automatic calibration of stereo images. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5039373.
Szott, Matthew, Wang, Zhehui, and Ruzic, David N. Wed . "Reconstruction and analysis of exploding wire particle trajectories via automatic calibration of stereo images". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5039373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1565813.
@article{osti_1565813,
title = {Reconstruction and analysis of exploding wire particle trajectories via automatic calibration of stereo images},
author = {Szott, Matthew and Wang, Zhehui and Ruzic, David N.},
abstractNote = {Quantitative understanding of the physics of dust or granular matter transport significantly impacts several aspects of burning plasma science and technology. Here, this work takes machine vision techniques popular in robotics and self-driving cars and applies them to identification and analysis of microparticles generated from exploding wires. Using only the image frames and knowledge of the intrinsic properties of the cameras, a Python code was written to identify the particles, automatically calibrate the relative image positions, and extract trajectory data. After identifying approximately 50 particles based on the timing of secondary particle explosions, the eight point and random sample consensus algorithms were used to determine the geometric correlation between the cameras. Over 100 particle matches were found between the two camera views. These correlated trajectories were used in subsequent 3D track reconstruction and analysis of the physics behind the particle motion. The 3D reconstruction resulted in accurate positioning of the particles with respect to the experimental setup. The particle motion was consistent with the effects of a 1 g gravitational field modified by drag forces. Lastly, the methods and analyses presented here can be used in many facets of high temperature plasma diagnostics.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5039373},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 10,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

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Cited by: 1 work
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