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Title: Isoprene Suppression by CO 2 Is Not Due to Triose Phosphate Utilization (TPU) Limitation

Abstract

Isoprene is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds produced by some, though not all, plant species. It confers stress tolerance in both emitting and non-emitting species and has large impacts on gene regulation as well as on atmospheric chemistry. Understanding the control of isoprene emission fromplants is important to understanding plant responses to future atmospheric conditions. Here, we confirmed that suppression of isoprene emission from plants by high CO 2 concentrations is reduced but not eliminated by high temperature. We tested whether the CO 2 suppression is caused by the reduction in ATP or NADPH availability caused by triose phosphate utilization (TPU) limitation of photosynthesis at high CO2. We measured CO 2 assimilation as well as several photosynthetic electron transport parameters under multiple atmospheric conditions in four plant species grown at ambient CO 2. While CO 2 sensitivity of isoprene emission was somewhat correlated with TPU in some species, in other species it was not. Poplar exhibited significant CO 2 suppression of isoprene emission but no evidence for TPU so we investigated further, measuring the electrochromic shift that gives information on ATP synthesis and photosystem I oxidation state. In all cases photosynthetic parameters were unchanged while isoprene emissionmore » dropped in response to increasing CO 2. Non-photorespiratory conditions (2% O 2) led to an increase in isoprene emission at low CO 2 but did not alleviate suppression by high CO 2. In all measured species the combination of higher temperature along with higher CO 2 concentrations led to a net increase of isoprene emission in response to a moderate scenario for temperature and CO 2 concentration in 2100 in the upper Midwest.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. MSU-DOE Plant Research Lab., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  2. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, East Lansing, MI (United States)
  3. MSU-DOE Plant Research Lab., East Lansing, MI (United States); Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1547386
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0018409
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Forests and Global Change
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2624-893X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
isoprene; CO2; high temperature; climate change; triose phosphate utilization limitation; chloroplast

Citation Formats

Lantz, Alexandra T., Solomon, Christine, Gog, Linus, McClain, Alan M., Weraduwage, Sarathi M., Cruz, Jeffrey A., and Sharkey, Thomas D. Isoprene Suppression by CO2 Is Not Due to Triose Phosphate Utilization (TPU) Limitation. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3389/ffgc.2019.00008.
Lantz, Alexandra T., Solomon, Christine, Gog, Linus, McClain, Alan M., Weraduwage, Sarathi M., Cruz, Jeffrey A., & Sharkey, Thomas D. Isoprene Suppression by CO2 Is Not Due to Triose Phosphate Utilization (TPU) Limitation. United States. doi:10.3389/ffgc.2019.00008.
Lantz, Alexandra T., Solomon, Christine, Gog, Linus, McClain, Alan M., Weraduwage, Sarathi M., Cruz, Jeffrey A., and Sharkey, Thomas D. Fri . "Isoprene Suppression by CO2 Is Not Due to Triose Phosphate Utilization (TPU) Limitation". United States. doi:10.3389/ffgc.2019.00008. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1547386.
@article{osti_1547386,
title = {Isoprene Suppression by CO2 Is Not Due to Triose Phosphate Utilization (TPU) Limitation},
author = {Lantz, Alexandra T. and Solomon, Christine and Gog, Linus and McClain, Alan M. and Weraduwage, Sarathi M. and Cruz, Jeffrey A. and Sharkey, Thomas D.},
abstractNote = {Isoprene is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds produced by some, though not all, plant species. It confers stress tolerance in both emitting and non-emitting species and has large impacts on gene regulation as well as on atmospheric chemistry. Understanding the control of isoprene emission fromplants is important to understanding plant responses to future atmospheric conditions. Here, we confirmed that suppression of isoprene emission from plants by high CO2 concentrations is reduced but not eliminated by high temperature. We tested whether the CO2 suppression is caused by the reduction in ATP or NADPH availability caused by triose phosphate utilization (TPU) limitation of photosynthesis at high CO2. We measured CO2 assimilation as well as several photosynthetic electron transport parameters under multiple atmospheric conditions in four plant species grown at ambient CO2. While CO2 sensitivity of isoprene emission was somewhat correlated with TPU in some species, in other species it was not. Poplar exhibited significant CO2 suppression of isoprene emission but no evidence for TPU so we investigated further, measuring the electrochromic shift that gives information on ATP synthesis and photosystem I oxidation state. In all cases photosynthetic parameters were unchanged while isoprene emission dropped in response to increasing CO2. Non-photorespiratory conditions (2% O2) led to an increase in isoprene emission at low CO2 but did not alleviate suppression by high CO2. In all measured species the combination of higher temperature along with higher CO2 concentrations led to a net increase of isoprene emission in response to a moderate scenario for temperature and CO2 concentration in 2100 in the upper Midwest.},
doi = {10.3389/ffgc.2019.00008},
journal = {Frontiers in Forests and Global Change},
number = ,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

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