skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

This content will become publicly available on June 28, 2020

Title: Tungsten oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for photoelectrochemical water splitting

Abstract

Hydrogen production from photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting using semiconductor photocatalysts has attracted great attention to realize clean and renewable energy from solar energy. The visible light response of WO 3 with a long hole diffusion length (~150 nm) and good electron mobility (~12 cm 2 V –1 s –1) makes it suitable as the photoanode. Yet, WO 3 suffers from issues including rapid recombination of photoexcited electron–hole pairs, photo-corrosion during the photocatalytic process due to the formation of peroxo-species, sluggish kinetics of photogenerated holes, and slow charge transfer at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. Our report highlights the approaches to overcome these drawbacks of WO 3 photoanodes, including: (i) the manipulation of nanostructured WO 3 photoanodes to decrease the nanoparticle size to promote hole migration to the WO 3/electrolyte interface which benefits the charge separation; (ii) doping or introducing oxygen vacancies to improve electrical conductivity; exposing high energy crystal surfaces to promote the consumption of photogenerated holes on the high-active crystal face, thereby suppressing the recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes; (iii) decorating with co-catalysts to reduce the overpotential which inhibits the formation of peroxo-species; (iv) other methods such as coupling with narrow band semiconductors to accelerate the charge separation and controllingmore » the crystal phase via annealing to reduce defects. These methods are reviewed with detailed examples.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [5]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [7]
  1. Beijing Univ. of Technology (China); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  2. Beijing Univ. of Technology (China)
  3. Zhengzhou Univ. (China)
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pondicherry Univ. (India)
  5. Henan Univ., Kaifeng (China)
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  7. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); Beijing Natural Science Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation
OSTI Identifier:
1546539
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nanoscale
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nanoscale; Journal ID: ISSN 2040-3364
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 08 HYDROGEN

Citation Formats

Zheng, Guangwei, Wang, Jinshu, Liu, Hu, Murugadoss, Vignesh, Zu, Guannan, Che, Haibing, Lai, Chen, Li, Hongyi, Ding, Tao, Gao, Qiang, and Guo, Zhanhu. Tungsten oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for photoelectrochemical water splitting. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1039/C9NR03474A.
Zheng, Guangwei, Wang, Jinshu, Liu, Hu, Murugadoss, Vignesh, Zu, Guannan, Che, Haibing, Lai, Chen, Li, Hongyi, Ding, Tao, Gao, Qiang, & Guo, Zhanhu. Tungsten oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for photoelectrochemical water splitting. United States. doi:10.1039/C9NR03474A.
Zheng, Guangwei, Wang, Jinshu, Liu, Hu, Murugadoss, Vignesh, Zu, Guannan, Che, Haibing, Lai, Chen, Li, Hongyi, Ding, Tao, Gao, Qiang, and Guo, Zhanhu. Fri . "Tungsten oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for photoelectrochemical water splitting". United States. doi:10.1039/C9NR03474A.
@article{osti_1546539,
title = {Tungsten oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for photoelectrochemical water splitting},
author = {Zheng, Guangwei and Wang, Jinshu and Liu, Hu and Murugadoss, Vignesh and Zu, Guannan and Che, Haibing and Lai, Chen and Li, Hongyi and Ding, Tao and Gao, Qiang and Guo, Zhanhu},
abstractNote = {Hydrogen production from photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting using semiconductor photocatalysts has attracted great attention to realize clean and renewable energy from solar energy. The visible light response of WO3 with a long hole diffusion length (~150 nm) and good electron mobility (~12 cm2 V–1 s–1) makes it suitable as the photoanode. Yet, WO3 suffers from issues including rapid recombination of photoexcited electron–hole pairs, photo-corrosion during the photocatalytic process due to the formation of peroxo-species, sluggish kinetics of photogenerated holes, and slow charge transfer at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. Our report highlights the approaches to overcome these drawbacks of WO3 photoanodes, including: (i) the manipulation of nanostructured WO3 photoanodes to decrease the nanoparticle size to promote hole migration to the WO3/electrolyte interface which benefits the charge separation; (ii) doping or introducing oxygen vacancies to improve electrical conductivity; exposing high energy crystal surfaces to promote the consumption of photogenerated holes on the high-active crystal face, thereby suppressing the recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes; (iii) decorating with co-catalysts to reduce the overpotential which inhibits the formation of peroxo-species; (iv) other methods such as coupling with narrow band semiconductors to accelerate the charge separation and controlling the crystal phase via annealing to reduce defects. These methods are reviewed with detailed examples.},
doi = {10.1039/C9NR03474A},
journal = {Nanoscale},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 28, 2020
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Electrochemical Photolysis of Water at a Semiconductor Electrode
journal, July 1972

  • Fujishima, Akira; Honda, Kenichi
  • Nature, Vol. 238, Issue 5358, p. 37-38
  • DOI: 10.1038/238037a0

Nanoporous BiVO4 Photoanodes with Dual-Layer Oxygen Evolution Catalysts for Solar Water Splitting
journal, February 2014


WO3 and W2N nanowire arrays for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production
journal, November 2009

  • Chakrapani, Vidhya; Thangala, Jyothish; Sunkara, Mahendra K.
  • International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Vol. 34, Issue 22, p. 9050-9059
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.ijhydene.2009.09.031

Growth of nanowire superlattice structures for nanoscale photonics and electronics
journal, February 2002

  • Gudiksen, Mark S.; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Wang, Jianfang
  • Nature, Vol. 415, Issue 6872, p. 617-620
  • DOI: 10.1038/415617a

Crystallographically Oriented Mesoporous WO3 Films:  Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications
journal, October 2001

  • Santato, Clara; Odziemkowski, Marek; Ulmann, Martine
  • Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 123, Issue 43, p. 10639-10649
  • DOI: 10.1021/ja011315x

In Situ Formation of an Oxygen-Evolving Catalyst in Neutral Water Containing Phosphate and Co2+
journal, August 2008


Daylight Photocatalysis by Carbon-Modified Titanium Dioxide
journal, October 2003

  • Sakthivel, Shanmugasundaram; Kisch, Horst
  • Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Vol. 42, Issue 40, p. 4908-4911
  • DOI: 10.1002/anie.200351577